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The Art of African Exploration
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Before 1800, travel to the interior was perilous and limited. Close scientific observation of animals and plants was difficult, and many early depictions of African species were flawed. But as interest in scientific accuracy grew, and more ambitious journeys became possible, explorers diligently illustrated Africa’s natural world.

Careful observation of live animals helped natural scientists to discover the minute differences between species and shed inaccurate assumptions. In addition to drawings, explorers sent back specimens — live animals whenever possible — to be studied at home. These creatures often ended up in menageries of exotic animals (precursors to the modern zoo) belonging to the nobility funding the expeditions.

 
 
The African Rhinoceros,  Image number:SIL28-276-09
The African Rhinoceros
Samuel Daniell was appointed artist for a British expedition into the Cape inter...
Rhinoceros zoo als die meest afgebeeldt worden [The rhinoceros as it had been commonly depicted],  Image number:SIL28-309-03
Rhinoceros zoo als die meest afgebeeldt worden [The rhinoceros as it had been commonly depicted]
The armored beast depicted here shows the influence 16th-century engravings of r...
Rhinoceros volgens deze beschryving [The rhinoceros according to this description],  Image number:SIL28-309-04
Rhinoceros volgens deze beschryving [The rhinoceros according to this description]
Preconceptions about the rhinoceros had changed little since the 16th century il...
Rhinoceros bicornalis,  Image number:SIL28-310-01
Rhinoceros bicornalis
This illustration, drawn from life, shows a rhinoceros from what is now Sudan. I...
 
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