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Displaying 1 - 10 from the 644 total records
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Notes on Some Stomatopod Crustacea from Southern Africa
Raymond B. Manning
17 pages, 4 figures, 1 table
1969 (Date of Issue: 1 January 1969)
Number 1, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.1
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Abstract

A small collection of stomatopods taken during the course of an ecological survey by the University of Capetown has provided the author the opportunity of redescribing the rare Lysiosquilla capensis Hansen, a species restricted to southern African waters. Analysis of the large series of Pterygosquilla armata (H. Milne-Edwards), which also has populations off South America and New Zealand, supports an earlier suggestion that the three populations are subspecifically distinct. The collection also includes several new records for southern African waters.


A Monograph of the Cephalopoda of the North Atlantic: The Family Cycloteuthidae
Richard E. Young and Clyde F. E. Roper
24 pages, 3 figures, 9 plates, 3 tables
1969 (Date of Issue: 9 June 1969)
Number 5, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.5
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

A new family of oegopsid cephalopods, Cycloteuthidae, is erected as a result of the elevation of Naef's subfamily Cycloteuthinae. Cycloteuthis sirventi Joubin, 1919, is redescribed based on new material from the Atlantic Ocean. A new genus, Discoteuthis, and two new species, D. discus and D. laciniosa, are described from the Atlantic Ocean. Larvae of C. sirventi and D. laciniosa are described. The distributions of the species of cycloteuthids in the Atlantic and Indian Oceans are presented. The relationships of the family, genera, and species are discussed.


A Revision of Six Species of the Flavus-Bidentatus Group of Eunice (Eunicidae: Polychaeta)
Kristian Fauchald
15 pages, 6 figures, 1 table
1969 (Date of Issue: 13 June 1969)
Number 6, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.6
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

The species here revised have yellow, bidentate subacicular hooks and branchiae limited to a short anterior region. They include E. biannulata Moore (1904), E. kobiensis McIntosh (1885, holotype examined), E. segregata (Chamberlin, 1919a, restricted), E. semisegregata, new species, E. valens (Chamberlin, 1919b, types examined), and E. websteri, new name for E. longicirrata Webster (1884, holotype examined). The relationship between the six species is discussed.


Species of Spalangia Latreille in the United States National Museum Collection (Hymenoptera: Pteromalidae)
B. D. Burks
7 pages, 3 figures
1969 (Date of Issue: 13 June 1969)
Number 2, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.2
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Abstract

A reappraisal of species of Spalangia in the USNM collection. The types of nine species described by Ashmead, Girault, Richardson, and Howard are all redescribed, their present condition given, and lectotypes designated, if necessary. Spalangia brasiliensis Ashmead is synonymized under chontalensis Cameron; muscidarum var. texensis Girault is synonymized under cameroni Fullaway. Spalangia attae, from the nest of an Atta ant in El Salvador, and dozieri, parasite of the sarcophagid fly Sarcodexia sternodontis Townsend in Puerto Rico, are described as new.


Bredin-Archbold-Smithsonian Biological Survey of Dominica: Bethyloidea (Hymenoptera)
Howard E. Evans
14 pages, 16 figures
1969 (Date of Issue: 13 June 1969)
Number 3, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.3
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Abstract

Two families of Bethyloidea are known to occur on Dominica: Bethylidae and Dryinidae. The family Bethylidae is represented by 19 species, of which 13 are here described as new. The two genera most commonly collected and containing the largest number of species are Parasierola and Goniozus; each genus contains 5 species on Dominica, and keys are presented for separating these species. The remaining genera are Apenesia and Dissomphalus (3 species each) and Pseudisobrachium, Anisepyris, and Holepyris (1 species each). Of the 19 species, only 6 are known to occur on other islands, one of these also on continental South America. The family Dryinidae is represented by one species of Mesodryinus and one species of Prodryinus, both described as new and both so far as known restricted to Dominica.


Bredin-Archbold-Smithsonian Biological Survey of Dominica: The Mosquitoes of Dominica (Diptera: Culicidae)
Alan Stone
8 pages
1969 (Date of Issue: 9 July 1969)
Number 16, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.16
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Abstract

Twenty-two species of mosquitoes are reported from the island of Dominica, seventeen for the first time. The synonymy of Wyeomyia medioalbipes (Lutz) is discussed and W. adelpha Dyar and Knab is resurrected, with W. ablabes Dyar and Knab and W. rolonca Dyar and Knab placed as synonyms of it. Notes on biology and distribution are given for all species.


Nearctic Walshiidae Notes and New Taxa (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea)
Ronald W. Hodges
30 pages, 46 figures
1969 (Date of Issue: 6 August 1969)
Number 18, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.18
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Abstract

Knowledge concerning the Nearitic members of the Walshiidae is made current by presenting new information concerning distribution and food plants; describing 14 species (Periploca hostiata, hortatrix, P. opinatrix, P. devia, P. dipapha, P. labes, Aeaea placatrix, Sorhagenia baucidis, S. pexa, Siskiwitia alticolans, Perimede eremos, P. parilis, P. circitor, P. maniola) and one genus (Siskiwitia) as new; presenting new keys to separate species of Periploca, Sorhagenia, and Perimede; and presenting a list of the known species.


Checklist of Amphibians and Reptiles of Barro Colorado Island, Panama, with Comments on Faunal Change and Sampling
Charles W. Myers and A. Stanley Rand
11 pages, 2 figures, 1 table
1969 (Date of Issue: 13 August 1969)
Number 10, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.10
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Abstract

One hundred species of amphibians (32) and reptiles (68) are estimated to occur on Barro Colorado Island, on the basis of approximately 47 years of collecting. The island is a seasonally wet, tropical forest locality in man-made Gatun Lake, central Panama. The faunal composition has not been static since the island's formation in 1912-1914. Some species have disappeared from the island whereas some others seem to be recent arrivals. Faunal change is at least partly correlated with vegetational succession, as old clearings change toward mature forest. The extirpation of certain “edge” species and their failure to have recolonized the laboratory clearing indicates that it is easier for a resident population to become extinct than for new colonization to occur. The sampling of such a complex, tropical herpetofauna is shown to be not so difficult as might be expected. Man-hours of collecting are plotted against percent of the herpetofauna for several collections, indicating that nearly one-half of the species can be collected in a few weeks of intensive effort in the rainy season. Approximately 80 percent of the species recorded from the island had been collected by 1931, after only about a decade of sporadic, unsystematic collecting by various persons. The generalization that tropical species have lower population densities than temperate species may not be valid for such groups as frogs and lizards but does seem true of snake faunas in low, humid forest regions. Snakes also are more difficult to collect in the tropics because of shifts in habits. There is a great expansion of tropical snakes into arboreal situations and a general avoidance (by all vertebrates) of rock and log microhabitats, which are frequently occupied by large arachnids. Small terrestrial snakes of lowland tropical forests tend either to be fossorial or to inhabit the leaf litter, where they are difficult to detect. Seasonal aggregations of snakes are rare in the wet tropics.


Tracheotaxy as a Generic Criterion in Himantariidae, with Proposal of Two New Bothriogastrine Genera (Chilopoda: Geophilomorpha)
R. E. Crabill, Jr.
9 pages, 23 figures
1969 (Date of Issue: 13 August 1969)
Number 12, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.12
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Abstract

Two new Bothriogastrine genera are proposed and based upon three species, two of them new, thereby recording for the first time the presence of the subfamily in the New World. The characterizations utilize a new intertaxic criterion, tracheotaxy, the study of tracheal configurations and patterns, which is introduced herein and described. Some evolutionary inferences are suggested. Additionally, other new criteria are employed, e.g., the nature of the pretarsal parungues. A key to all known Bothriogastrine genera is appended.


Indian Ocean Kinorhyncha: 1, Condyloderes and Sphenoderes, New Cyclorhagid Genera
Robert P. Higgins
13 pages, 23 figures, 3 tables
1969 (Date of Issue: 13 August 1969)
Number 14, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.14
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Abstract

Condyloderes multispinosus (McIntyre, 1962), new genus, new combination; Condyloderes paradoxus, new species; and Sphenoderes indicus, new genus, new species (phylum Kinorhyncha) are described from the coasts of Scotland and India.


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