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Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Displaying 11 - 20 from the 644 total records
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A Monograph of the Cephalopoda of the North Atlantic: The Family Joubiniteuthidae
Richard E. Young and Clyde F. E. Roper
10 pages, 6 figures, 1 table
1969 (Date of Issue: 13 August 1969)
Number 15, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.15
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Abstract

Joubiniteuthis portieri (Joubin, 1912) is redescribed on the basis of new material from the Atlantic Ocean. Valdemaria danae Joubin, 1931, is synonymized with Joubiniteuthis portieri, and the peculiar hectocotylus previously described for V. danae is shown to be an artifact. The validity of the family Joubiniteuthidae Naef is confirmed. The Joubiniteuthidae is thought to be most closely related to the Mastigoteuthidae and Promachoteuthidae.


Life History Notes on Some Egyptian Solitary Wasps and Bees and Their Associates (Hymenoptera: Aculeata)
Karl V. Krombein
18 pages, 28 figures
1969 (Date of Issue: 13 August 1969)
Number 19, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.19
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Abstract

cal notes are presented on seven Egyptian wasps: Chrysura pustulosa (Abeille), Chrysis episcopalis Spinola, Eumenes mediterraneus Kriechbaumer, Rhynchium oculatum (Fabricius), Telostegus melanurus (Klug), Trypoxylon aegyptium Kohl, and Philanthus triangulum abdelcader (Lepeletier); seven Egyptian bees: Hylaeus adspersa (Alfken), Heriades moricei Friese, Osmia latreillei (Spinola), O. aurantiaca Stanek, Megachile variscopa Pérez, M. minutissima Radoszkowski, and M. flavipes (Spinola); and on the sarcophagid fly Miltogrammidium chivae Rohdendorf, parasitic on an unknown species of Megachile bee.


Bredin-Archbold-Smithsonian Biological Survey of Dominica: West Indian Stenomidae (Lepidoptera: Gelechioidea)
W. Donald Duckworth
21 pages, 30 figures, 1 table
1969 (Date of Issue: 13 August 1969)
Number 4, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.4
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Abstract

All the species of the microlepidopterous family Stenomidae known to occur in the West Indies are reviewed regarding their taxonomic history, zoogeography, identity, and morphology. Two new species are described, Chlamydastis dominicae and Mothonica cubana, one of which C. dominicae, is the first representative of the genus Chlamydastis recorded from the West Indies. Keys to the species based on structures of the male and female genitalia and characters of the wing maculation are provided. Distribution maps, photographs of the adults, drawings of the male and female genitalia, and all known biological information are included.


An Illustrated Key to the Families of the Order Teuthoidea (Cephalopoda)
Clyde F. E. Roper, Richard E. Young and Gilbert L. Voss
32 pages, 2 figures, 16 plates, 1 table
1969 (Date of Issue: 18 August 1969)
Number 13, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.13
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Abstract

A dichotomous key to the twenty-five families of cephalopods of the order Teuthoidea is presented. A supplementary chart of basic, external teuthoid characters is included. Representatives of each family are illustrated. The current state of systematics within each family is briefly discussed.


Morphology, Ontogeny, and Intraspecific Variation of Spinacopia, a New Genus of Myodocopid Ostracod (Sarsiellidae)
Louis S. Kornicker
50 pages, 26 figures, 6 plates, 7 tables
1969 (Date of Issue: 22 August 1969)
Number 8, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.8
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Abstract

Morphology, biology, and variability of a new genus with four new species are described from collections of deep-sea ostracods obtained by the Lamont Geological Observatory and Woods Hole Biological Laboratory in the Atlantic, Antarctic, and Indian Oceans. Adult females far outnumber males in collections, but juvenile males and females are present in equal numbers indicating that adult males are short lived. Microtome sections of male and female genitalia document that the male transfers sperm to the female in ovoid spermatophores which are attached externally. Examination of stomachs shows that members of the new genus are carnivores—feeding on copepods, ostracods, and nematodes. Apparently adult males do not eat. A key is presented for identification of early instar stages by means of examination of sixth and seventh limbs.


Habitats, Flora, Mammals, and Wasps of Gebel 'Uweinat, Libyan Desert
Dale J. Osborn and Karl V. Krombein
18 pages, 13 figures, 1 table
1969 (Date of Issue: 27 August 1969)
Number 11, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.11
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Abstract

The habitats at Gebel 'Uweinat, Libyan Desert, at the juncture of Egypt, Libya, and Sudan, are described and illustrated by photographs. Annotated lists are presented of the 55 species of plants collected there, 6 species of mammals, and 30 species of wasps.


Recent Ostracodes of the Family Pontocyprididae Chiefly from the Indian Ocean
Rosalie F. Maddocks
56 pages, 35 figures, 5 tables
1969 (Date of Issue: 17 September 1969)
Number 7, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.7
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Recent ostracodes of the marine family Pontocyprididae may be identified as easily by the carapace as by appendage characteristics, especially by the five discrete central muscle scars. The five genera and three subgenera are each distinguished by a diagnostic arrangement of the muscle scars, as well as by carapace shape and characters of the appendages and genitalia.

From collections of the International Indian Ocean Expedition, from other collections at the Smithsonian Institution, and from the type “Challenger” material of Brady (1880), 48 species and 2 subspecies (12 new, 8 pre-existing, 30 in open nomenclature) are described here and assigned to four genera. Two new subgenera, Ekpontocypris and Schedopontocypris, are established within the genus Propontocypris.

The following species and subspecies are new: Propontocypris (Propontocypris) crocata, P. (P.) quasicrocata, P. (P.) paradispar, P. (P.?) lobodonta, Propontocypris (Ekpontocypris) litoricola, P. (E.) l. litoricola, P. (E.) l. admirantensis, P. (E.) mcmurdoensis, P. (E.?) epicyrta, Propontocypris (Schedopontocypris) bengalensis, Australoecia mckenziei, A. abyssophilia.


Five Species of Deep-Water Cyclopoid Copepods from the Plankton of the Gulf of Alaska
Gayle A. Heron and David M. Damkaer
24 pages, 28 figures, 1 table
1969 (Date of Issue: 23 September 1969)
Number 20, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.20
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Abstract

This report considers five species of Cyclopoida found in samples collected from 340 to 1275 meters in the Gulf of Alaska. Lubbockia wilsonae, new species, is described. Other descriptions are given for Lubbockia glacialis, Pseudolubbockia dilatata, Ratania atlantica, and Pontoeciella abyssicola.


Ten Rhyparus from the Western Hemisphere (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae)
Oscar L. Cartwright and Robert E. Woodruff
20 pages, 15 figures
1969 (Date of Issue: 6 November 1969)
Number 21, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.21
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

This is the first report of the genus Rhyparus (Coleoptera; Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae) being found in the Western Hemisphere. It is closely related to Termitodius, a genus known from Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia, but easily recognized by characters given. One South American species from Bolivia is transferred from Termitodius and nine new species are described and illustrated as follows: Rhyparus spangleri from Costa Rica; opacus from Mexico;blantoni from Panama; suspiciosus from Costa Rica; mexicanus from Mexico and Costa Rica; zayasi from Cuba and Jamaica; sculpturatus from Costa Rica; isidroi from Costa Rica; and costaricensis from Costa Rica and Mexico.


Revision of the Aphroditoid Polychaetes of the Family Eulepethidae Chamberlin (=Eulepidinae Darboux; =Pareulepidae Hartman)
Marian H. Pettibone
44 pages, 31 figures
1969 (Date of Issue: 6 November 1969)
Number 41, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.41
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Abstract

The family Eulepethidae is reviewed and revised, based on a reexamination of most of the previous records in the literature. The family characteristics are summarized and its systematic position among the other families of the superfamily Aphroditoidea is discussed.

The family is represented by four genera: Eulepethus Chamberlin (=Eulepis Grube), with a single species; Pareulepis Darboux, including two species and one synonym; Mexieulepis Rioja, with a single species and one synonym; and Grubeulepis, new genus, including four previously described species and three new species. In addition, Eulepis challengeriae McIntosh is considered questionable.


Displaying 11 - 20 from the 644 total records