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Explore the Collection: All Books | All Images | Previous Page

Author:
Jules Verne (1828-1905)
Title/Imprint:
From the Earth to the Moon Direct in Ninety-seven Hours and Twenty Minutes, and a Trip around it. Trans. by Louis Mercier and Eleanor King (De la terre à la lune)
Scribner, Armstrong: New York , 1874

About this image:
The front cover of the book carries an embossed illustration of the frontispiece. Note the "First", "Second", and "Third" class carriages. (Front Cover)

Original caption:
Front Cover

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About this image:
Rev. Lewis Mercier here alters the spelling of his name so as not to appear to profit from his clerical position. (Title Page)

Original caption:
Title Page

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About this image:
The frontispiece of the book showing "Projectile Trains for the Moon" immediately attracts the reader's attention. Paradoxically, the text which refers to this illustration was deleted from the English and American editions. Note the smoke coming from the steam engine pulling the train. Space travel for the masses may become a reality as Richard Branson is now proposing civilian space flights for paying passengers. (Frontispiece)

Original caption:
PROJECTILE TRAINS FOR THE MOON

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About this image:
An elaborate drawing usually accompanies the introduction of a principal character. Here President Barbicane is shown with the accoutrements of war forming the furniture of the "Gun Club" in the background. (p. 10 Facing)

Original caption:
PRESIDENT BARBICANE

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About this image:
Admirals Rodman and Dahlgren were two American inventors who perfected heavy cannon design. The tapered barrel reduced the amount of iron required for the same range. (p. 34 Facing)

Original caption:
THE RODMAN COLUMBIAD

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About this image:
Tampa is only about 130 miles from Cape Canaveral, site of the first moon launch. Verne correctly identified the range of latitudes and time of year for a moon launch. (p. 66 Facing)

Original caption:
TAMPA TOWN PREVIOUS TO THE UNDERTAKING

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About this image:
Tampa Town becomes a mini city, foretelling the industrial development around Cape Canaveral a century later. (p. 82 Facing)

Original caption:
TAMPA TOWN AFTER THE UNDERTAKING

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About this image:
Michel Ardan, a french bon vivant and boulevardier, is introduced here wearing his jaunty clothes as he arrives on board the Atlanta. (p. 88 Facing)

Original caption:
MICHEL ARDAN

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About this image:
The capsule is unloaded at Stone's Hill near Tampa, now part of residential subdivision. Verne correctly predicts the use of the newly discovered light weight metal aluminium for the capsule. National pride also plays a part, indicated by the numerous flags. (p. 122 Facing)

Original caption:
THE ARRIVAL OF THE PROJECTILE AT STONE'S HILL

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About this image:
Here we see the interior of the projectile fitted out with equipment for the journey — a collapsing telescope, pickaxes, guns, trees to plant, the oxygen apparatus. Below are the baffles for reducing the shock of launch. The guns were used as retro-rockets to reduce the speed of the projectile as it approached the earth. (p. 130 Facing)

Original caption:
THE INTERIOR OF THE PROJECTILE

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About this image:
Verne's travellers always preserve their creature comforts: light, heat, food, and drink. (p. 152 Facing)

Original caption:
THE GAS CAUGHT FIRE

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About this image:
The two dogs, Diana and Satellite, figure prominently in the first part of the story; they are forgotten when the capsule returns to earth. Verne may have composed the ending much later than the rest of the book. (p. 154 Facing)

Original caption:
DIANA AND SATELLITE

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About this image:
Verne correctly notes the visibility of the sun as the projectile emerges from the earth's shadow. (p.172 Facing)

Original caption:
THE SUN CHOSE TO BE OF THE PARTY

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About this image:
The travellers develop oxygen narcosis when their oxygen generator temporarily malfunctions. (p. 205 Facing)

Original caption:
I COULD HAVE VENTURED OUT ON THE TOP OF THE PROJECTILE

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About this image:
As the voyagers move into the moon's shadow, the projectile encounters the "absolute cold of space" causing their breath to condense as snow. (p. 258 Facing)

Original caption:
THE VAPOR OF OUR BREATH WILL FALL IN SNOW AROUND US

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About this image:
Light and heat are enjoyed when the sun reappears. The travellers philosophise about the importance of sunlight. (p. 273 Facing)

Original caption:
LIGHT AND HEAT, ALL LIFE IS CONTAINED IN THEM

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About this image:
Verne appreciates that objects thrown out of the capsule will travel immutably in the same orbit and with the same speed as the projectile and thus remain near. (p. 291 Facing)

Original caption:
AROUND THEM WERE OBJECTS WHICH HAD BEEN THROWN OUT

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About this image:
The splashdown is in the Pacific Ocean, not far from the point where the Apollo travellers landed. (p. 319 Facing)

Original caption:
WHITE ALL, BARBICANE

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