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Displaying 11 - 20 from the 98 total records
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A Contribution to the Guianan Flora: Dalechampia, Haematostemon, Omphalea, Pera, Plukenetia, and Tragia (Euphorbiaceae) with Notes on Subfamily Acalyphoideae
Lynn J. Gillespie and W. Scott Armbruster
48 pages, 14 figures
1997 (Date of Issue: 15 October 1997)
Number 86, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.86
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Abstract

Dalechampia, Haematostemon, Omphalea, Pera, Plukenetia, and Tragia (Euphorbiaceae, subfamily Acalyphoideae) are treated for the Guianas. Notes on Guianan Euphorbiaceae, subfamily Acalyphoideae, tribes Omphaleae, Pereae, and Plukenetieae, and ecological notes on each species are given. Also included is a key to the subfamilies of Euphorbiaceae and a key to the Guianan genera of subfamily Acalyphoideae.


Ecology of the Podocarpaceae in Tropical Forests
Benjamin L. Turner and Lucas A. Cernusak, editors
viii, 207 pages; 70 figures, 18 tables
2011 (Date of Issue: 14 October 2011)
Number 95, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.95.viii
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The emergence of angiosperms in tropical forests at the expense of the gymnosperms, their ancestral relatives, was one of the most important events in the evolutionary history of terrestrial plants. Gymnosperms were nearly eliminated from the tropics after the evolution of angiosperms in the early Cretaceous, yet conifers of the Podocarpaceae are among the few gymnosperm families that persist in tropical forests worldwide. Podocarps are often considered to be restricted to montane sites in the tropics, a feature of their biogeography that is used by paleoecologists to reconstruct past forest communities. However, podocarps also occur in the lowland tropics, where they can be the dominant component of forest canopies. Podocarps have proved to be remarkably adaptable in many cases: members of the family have a semi-aquatic lifestyle, exhibit drought tolerance and resprouting, and include the only known parasitic gymnosperm. Other intriguing aspects of podocarp physiology include the mechanism of water transport in the leaves and the conspicuous root nodules, which are not involved in nitrogen fixation but instead house arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi. Perhaps most surprising, paleobotanical evidence indicates that far from being ?relict? members of tropical forest communities, podocarps have been dispersing into the tropics since the late Eocene epoch more than 30 million years ago. These and other aspects of the Podocarpaceae explored in this volume have far-reaching implications for understanding the ecology and evolution of tropical rain forests.


Epidermal Features and Spikelet Micromorphology in Oryza and Related Genera (Poaceae: Oryzeae)
Edward E. Terrell, Paul M. Peterson and William P. Wergin
50 pages, 33 figures, 3 tables
2001 (Date of Issue: 16 February 2001)
Number 91, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.91
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Using scanning electron microscopy, this study examines the spikelet morphology of sixteen species of Oryza, one species of Leersia, and one species each of the monotypic genera Porteresia and Rhynchoryza. A detailed discussion of the spikelet epidermal features and their relationship to the pedicel and cupule is presented. As the pedicel and cupule of species of Oryza are below the point of articulation of the spikelet, have similar epidermal features, and are free from the vascular cylinder that proceeds upward (distally) into the spikelet, we conclude that the pedicel cupules are not glumes but are merely expanded apices of the pedicels. An original data set of 14 morphological characters was used to perform parsimony and UPGMA analyses. Of these 14 characters, six describe the lemma, three describe the rachilla, two describe the glumes, two describe the articulation point and callus shape, and one describes the embryo. Our classification of Oryza recognizes three subgenera: Oryza subg. Oryza; O. subg. Brachyantha, new combination and status; and O. subg. Schlechteria, new combination and status. Within subgenus Oryza we recognize three sections: Oryza sect. Oryza (including O. ser. Oryza and O. ser. Latifoliae); O. sect. Ridleyanae; and O. sect. Padia.


Fine Structure of the Cortex in the Lichen Family Parmeliaceae Viewed with the Scanning-electron Microscope
Mason E. Hale, Jr.
92 pages, 150 figures, 1 table
1973 (Date of Issue: 5 March 1973)
Number 10, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.10
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Abstract

The scanning-electron microscope was used to examine the cortical surface of 123 species of lichens in 12 genera of the lichen family Parmeliaceae. Two general types of cortex were found, one consisting of exposed hyphae and one with the hyphae covered by a thin polysaccharide epicortex. The epicorticate species fell into two groups, one with a tightly appressed continuous epicortex and one with a more loosely associated pored epicortex. Type of epicortex is a constant character at the genus and section level and appears to have considerable usefulness in the taxonomy of the family.


Flora of Dominica, Part 2: Dicotyledoneae
Dan H. Nicolson, with Robert A. DeFilipps and Alice C. Nicolson
274 pages
1991 (Date of Issue: 19 February 1991)
Number 77, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.77
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Abstract

This completes the coverage of the vascular plants of Dominica. The introduction recapitulates and updates botanical information of Part 1 (Hodge, 1954). The main text begins with an artificial (identification) key to dicotyledonous families. Taxa are arranged alphabetically within the hierarchy, families, then genera within families and species within genera. Keys are provided when more than one taxon is involved. Each species has a restricted synonymy, vernacular name(s) (if known), short description, general distribution, local habitat with localities and collections. Notes are sometimes appended involving biology, nomenclature, usage, etc. The synonymy also references critical works concerning the species.

Part 1 accounted for 32 families, 190 genera, and 382 species. Part 2 accounts for 123 families, 482 genera, and 844 species. In other words, Dominica has a vascular flora of about 155 families, 672 genera, and 1226 species.

There is one novelty: a new combination, Ilex macfadyenii subsp. ovata (Grisebach) Nicolson.


Flora of Micronesia, 1: Gymnospermae
F. Raymond Fosberg and Marie-Hélène Sachet
15 pages, 1 figure
1975 (Date of Issue: 13 March 1975)
Number 20, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.20
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A brief introduction treats the scope and plan of the flora, the circumstances under which it is being written, discussions of special problems encountered, materials used, and acknowledgments. Floristic taxonomic treatments with keys, synonymy, descriptions, distribution, ethnobotany including vernacular names, and citations of geographic records and herbarium specimens are provided for Cycadaceae, Araucariaceae, Podocarpaceae, Pinaceae, Taxodiaceae, Cupressaceae, and Gnetaceae. Other families will follow in future papers as they are completed.


Flora of Micronesia, 2: Casuarinaceae, Piperaceae, and Myricaceae
F. Raymond Fosberg and Marie-Hélène Sachet
28 pages, 1 figure
1975 (Date of Issue: 18 September 1975)
Number 24, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.24
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Abstract

The second installment of the Flora of Micronesia gives systematic treatments, including descriptions, synonymy, pertinent literature references, keys, ethnobotany, citations, geographic records, and specimens examined, of the families Casuarinaceae, Piperaceae, and Myricaceae.


Flora of Micronesia, 3: Convolvulaceae
F. Raymond Fosberg and Marie-Hélène Sachet
34 pages, 1 figure
1977 (Date of Issue: 2 February 1977)
Number 36, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.36
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The third installment of the Flora of Micronesia includes a brief introduction with acknowledgments and references to the previously published parts of the flora. A floristic taxonomic account of the Convolvulaceae of Micronesia is given, with descriptions, keys, synonymy, ethnobotany (including vernacular names and uses), and citations of geographic records and herbarium specimens.


Flora of Micronesia, 4: Caprifoliaceae–Compositae
F. Raymond Fosberg and Marie-Hélène Sachet
71 pages, 1 figure
1980 (Date of Issue: 25 November 1980)
Number 46, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.46
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The fourth installment of the Flora of Micronesia includes a brief introduction with acknowledgments and references to previously published parts of the flora. A floristic taxonomic account of the Caprifoliaceae, Campanulaceae, Goodeniaceae, and Compositae of Micronesia is given with descriptions, keys, synonymy, ethnobotany (including vernacular names and uses), and citations of geographic records and herbarium specimens.


Flora of Micronesia, 5: Bignoniaceae–Rubiaceae
F. Raymond Fosberg, Marie-Hélène Sachet and Royce L. Oliver
135 pages, 1 figure
1993 (Date of Issue: 2 February 1993)
Number 81, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.81
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The fifth installment of the Flora of Micronesia includes a brief introduction with acknowledgments and references to previously published parts of the flora. A floristic taxonomic account of the Bignoniaceae, Pedaliaceae, Gesneriaceae, Lentibulariaceae, Acanthaceae, Myoporaceae, Plantaginaceae, and Rubiaceae of Micronesia is given with descriptions, keys, synonymy, ethnobotany (including vernacular names and uses), and citations of geographic records and herbarium specimens.


Displaying 11 - 20 from the 98 total records