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Displaying 31 - 40 from the 98 total records
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Grasses of Washington, D.C.
Kamal M. Ibrahim and Paul M. Peterson
viii + 128 pages, 190 figures
2014 (Date of Issue: 6 March 2014)
Number 99, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.19382812.99
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Abstract

A vegetative key, descriptions, and illustrations for the identification of 182 native and naturalized grasses that occur in Washington, D.C., are presented. In addition, we provide a glossary of terms and indexes to scientific and common names. The key is based on vegetative characters to allow identification of specimens that primarily do not have flowering structures (inflorescences and spikelets).


Growth and Population Dynamics of Espeletia (Compositae) in the Venezuelan Andes
Alan P. Smith
45 pages, 19 figures, 20 tables
1981 (Date of Issue: 23 October 1981)
Number 48, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.48
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Abstract

Espeletia (Compositae, Heliantheae) is a major component of alpine and subalpine plant communities in the Venezuelan Andes. A detailed analysis of population dynamics was undertaken for Espeletia species representing the arborescent, caulescent rosette, and acaulescent rosette forms. Mortality, growth, and reproduction were recorded during a 15-month period for E. schultzii, and E. lutescens (caulescent rosette species), E. floccosa and E. atropurpurea (acaulescent rosette species), and E. humbertii (an arborescent species of treeline forests). Espeletia floccosa is obligately semelparous; all other study species are iteroparous. Microenvironmental variables were measured at all sites.


A History of Botanical Exploration in Amazonian Ecuador, 1739–1988
S. S. Renner
39 pages, 1 figure, 1 table
1993 (Date of Issue: 6 April 1993)
Number 82, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.82
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Abstract

Information is provided on all individuals known to have collected botanical specimens in the eastern Ecuadorean lowlands below 600 m altitude from 1739 until 30 May 1988. This area belongs to the provinces Sucumbíos, Napo, Pastaza, Morona-Santiago, and Zamora-Chinchipe and covers about 71,000 km2. Besides biographical data, are included collecting dates and localities, herbaria containing the specimens, and pertinent references to publications by the collector, or about the collector or the expedition. The data are arranged alphabetically by collector, including cross references between main and secondary collectors. Altogether 205 collectors are treated. The total number of specimens gathered in the eastern Ecuadorean lowlands (excluding duplicates, including bryophytes and fungi) is around 61,000, i.e., about 86 per 100 km2, representing an estimated 4000 species of vascular plants. An index to localities and a map provide general information on the main collecting regions.


History of Botanical Exploration in Territorio Federal Amazonas, Venezuela
Otto Huber and John J. Wurdack
83 pages, 10 maps, 2 tables
1984 (Date of Issue: 8 November 1984)
Number 56, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.56
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Abstract

Detailed information is provided on botanical activities in the Territorio Federal Amazonas, southern Venezuela, during the period 1800 to 31 December 1982. Emphasis is on botanical collections, their collectors, localities, itineraries, time period, number, and final deposit in the world's herbaria. The data are arranged both chronologically and alphabetically by collectors, including cross references between main and secondary collectors. Altogether 188 collectors are listed, 124 of them being main collectors. The total collected plant numbers in T. F. Amazonas is now about 50,000 (not including duplicates), representing an estimated 3000 to 5000 species. A short geographical outline at the beginning of the paper, accompanied by a map, provides general information on main localities, rivers, mountains, and other features often mentioned in the text and on the labels of herbarium specimens.


An Introduction to the Botanical Type Specimen Register
Stanwyn G. Shetler, Mary Jane Petrini, Constance Graham Carley, M. J. Harvey, Larry E. Morse and Thomas E. Kopfler, and collaborators
186 pages, 3 figures
1973 (Date of Issue: 3 August 1973)
Number 12, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.12
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Abstract

In the first part, the development of a computer-based system for storing and retrieving information about botanical type specimens is described from its pilot stage to its present operational stage. The concept, purpose, and scope are explained, and the operational procedures are outlined. Ways of using and contributing to this computerized register of types, both in the short-run and in the long-run, are proposed. A statistical summary of the content of the Type Register as of 30 September 1972 is given. Over 13,000 specimens representing more than 10,000 taxa have been registered. The second part consists of a Catalog of more than 1,000 specimens representing over 600 taxa of the genus Carex (Cyperaceae), which are deposited in ten major American herbaria, and the Catalog is cross-indexed five different ways: by author, publication date, collector, country, and herbarium. An introduction summarizes the preparation and editing of the Catalog. This Carex Catalog represents the first published installment of the Type Register and as such is intended to serve as an example.


Leaf Anatomy and Systematics of New World Velloziaceae
Edward S. Ayensu
125 pages, 24 figures, 51 plates
1974 (Date of Issue: 25 July 1974)
Number 15, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.15
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Abstract

The leaf anatomy of 106 species of New World Velloziaceae has been studied with the purpose of providing important character-states in assessing the systematics of the family. Transverse section of the leaves have shown the type of sclerenchyma and mesophyll patterns that are assignable either to the genus Vellozia or Barbacenia (sensu lato). In addition to the light microscope, the scanning electron microscope was used to examine epidermal surfaces of the leaves as well as their internal structures. The SEM has served as a remarkable tool in allowing us to examine the topography of the leaf surface in three-dimension. Details of the structure of the stomata, the furrows in the leaf, and the types of hairs, including coalescent hairs, have been observed for the first time. The application of leaf anatomy in the taxonomy of the family has been stressed. Light and scanning electron micrographs are presented as an aid in the identification of each species.


Marine Algae of Dominica
Wm. Randolph Taylor and Charles F. Rhyne
16 pages, 2 figures
1970 (Date of Issue: 5 March 1970)
Number 3, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.3
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Abstract

One hundred forty-one species of marine algae are reported from Dominica, W.I., with field notes. An ecological description of twelve collecting localities is given. A discussion of the differences between Agardhiella tenera (J. Agardh) Schmitz of the West Indies and New England is made which results in a new combination, Agardhiella baileyi (Harvey) W. R. Taylor, for the material from New England.


Marine Algae of the Northern Gulf of California: Chlorophyta and Phaeophyceae
James N. Norris
x, 276 pages
2010 (Date of Issue: 16 February 2010)
Number 94, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.94.276
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Abstract

The present treatment constitutes a taxonomic study of the green and brown benthic marine algae currently known in the northern Gulf of California. In all, 133 species were found: 4 classes, 7 orders, 13 families, 20 genera, and 63 species of Chlorophyta and 9 orders, 15 families, 26 genera, and 70 species of Phaeophyceae. The systematic account is a guide to the identification of marine algae from the northern Gulf of California, with the accepted name, keys, and descriptions of the orders, families, genera, and species. The date, place, and author(s) of valid publication of each taxon are cited. The current name for each species is given along with its basionym, type locality, synonyms, relevant taxonomic studies, habitat, and distribution in the Gulf of California and in the Pacific Ocean. Illustrations are provided for most species. A remarks section includes additional information on taxonomy, nomenclature, ecology, and/or other problems or facts of interest. In addition to reviewing the taxonomic phycological literature pertinent to the Gulf of California and Pacific M?xico, new records and distribution extensions are given. Four new sections of Sargassum subgen. Sargassum are proposed: S. sect. herporhizum E. Y. Dawson ex J. N. Norris, S. sect. johnstonii E. Y. Dawson ex J. N. Norris, S. sect. lapazeanum E. Y. Dawson ex J. N. Norris, and S. sect. sinicola E. Y. Dawson ex J. N. Norris; five new combinations are made: Desmarestia munda subsp. mexicana (E. Y. Dawson) J. N. Norris, Epicladia condensata (Setchell et N. L. Gardner) J. N. Norris, Epicladia mexicana (Setchell et N. L. Gardner) J. N. Norris, Hincksia bryantii (Setchell et N. L. Gardner) J. N. Norris, and Sargassum sinicola subsp. camouii J. N. Norris et Yensen. One new species, Sporochnus neushulii J. N. Norris, is described.


A Monograph of the Genus Eperua (Leguminosae: Caesalpinioideae)
Richard S. Cowan
45 pages, 13 figures, 2 tables
1975 (Date of Issue: 4 September 1975)
Number 28, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.28
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Abstract

All available data are brought together in a monographic treatment of the legume genus Eperua. Eighteen taxa are considered of which four are described as new: E. duckeana, E. obtusata, E. grandiflora ssp. guyanensis, and E. jenmanii ssp. sandwithii. Also one new combination is made: E. glabriflora (Ducke) Cowan. In addition to gross morphology, anatomy of leaf epidermis and palynology of most of the species are presented for the first time. Pollen morphology is particularly instructive with respect to the classification derived principally from vegetative and floral morphology.


A Monograph of the Lichen Genus Bulbothrix Hale (Parmeliaceae)
Mason E. Hale, Jr.
29 pages, 7 figures
1976 (Date of Issue: 31 August 1976)
Number 32, Smithsonian Contributions to Botany
DOI: 10.5479/si.0081024X.32
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Abstract

A world-level revision is given for the 29 species of Bulbothrix, a generic segregate of Parmelia characterized by marginal bulbate cilia and production of atranorin in the upper cortex. The genus is primarily tropical in distribution and best developed in secondary forests. The main center of speciation is Brazil with 14 species, and the genus is also well represented in Africa. The New World species have a high frequency of depsides and orcinol depsidones, whereas the Old World species usually contain β-orcinol depsidones. One new species, B. klementii Hale, and one new combination, B. goebelii (Zenker) Hale, are proposed.


Displaying 31 - 40 from the 98 total records