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Distribution of Recent Benthic Foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico, Volume 1
Stephen J. Culver and Martin A. Buzas
443 pages, 129 figures
1981 (Date of Issue: 31 December 1981)
Number 8.1, Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences
DOI: 10.5479/si.01960768.8.1
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Abstract

A computer file of all published (presence or absence) distributional data on the living and dead recent benthic foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico was constructed from 77 papers published since 1918. Manipulation of this file produced 5 catalogs and 296 maps.

Catalog 1 lists alphabetically species names with publication and locality information as recorded in the literature (i.e., unsynonymized). Catalog 2 lists synonymized species names (in the same numerical line order as Catalog 1) with publication and locality information. Catalogs 3 and 4 list alphabetically all unsynonymized and synonymized species names, respectively. Catalog 5 lists synonymized names by increasing latitude and longitude.

During the past 60 years, 1219 names have been used to record benthic foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico. Through synonymization, these were reduced to 848 species, of which 295 occur at 16 or more of the 426 sample localities. Computer-generated maps were drawn for these 295 most commonly recorded species.

Species were grouped by depth and geographic distribution through visual examination of the maps. Twenty overlapping categories describe the depth distribution of the commonly recorded species. The depth distribution of 15 species varies considerably around the Gulf.

Geographically the 295 most commonly recorded species may be grouped into 11 categories. Forty-eight percent of the species are ubiquitous around the Gulf. Circum-Gulf of Mexico provincial boundaries cannot be recognized but preliminary analysis distinguishes concentric benthic foraminiferal provinces whose margins can be related to particular depths and physiographic regions.


Distribution of Recent Benthic Foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico, Volume 2
Stephen J. Culver and Martin A. Buzas
487 pages
1981 (Date of Issue: 31 December 1981)
Number 8.2, Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences
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Abstract

A computer file of all published (presence or absence) distributional data on the living and dead recent benthic foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico was constructed from 77 papers published since 1918. Manipulation of this file produced 5 catalogs and 296 maps.

Catalog 1 lists alphabetically species names with publication and locality information as recorded in the literature (i.e., unsynonymized). Catalog 2 lists synonymized species names (in the same numerical line order as Catalog 1) with publication and locality information. Catalogs 3 and 4 list alphabetically all unsynonymized and synonymized species names, respectively. Catalog 5 lists synonymized names by increasing latitude and longitude.

During the past 60 years, 1219 names have been used to record benthic foraminifera in the Gulf of Mexico. Through synonymization, these were reduced to 848 species, of which 295 occur at 16 or more of the 426 sample localities. Computer-generated maps were drawn for these 295 most commonly recorded species.

Species were grouped by depth and geographic distribution through visual examination of the maps. Twenty overlapping categories describe the depth distribution of the commonly recorded species. The depth distribution of 15 species varies considerably around the Gulf.

Geographically the 295 most commonly recorded species may be grouped into 11 categories. Forty-eight percent of the species are ubiquitous around the Gulf. Circum-Gulf of Mexico provincial boundaries cannot be recognized but preliminary analysis distinguishes concentric benthic foraminiferal provinces whose margins can be related to particular depths and physiographic regions.


Distribution of Recent Benthic Foraminifera off the North American Atlantic Coast
Stephen J. Culver and Martin A. Buzas
28 pages, 14 figures, 10 tables
1980 (Date of Issue: 11 July 1980)
Number 6, Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences
DOI: 10.5479/si.01960768.6.1
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Abstract

A computer file of all available distributional data on the recent benthic foraminifera off the North American Atlantic Coast was constructed from 142 papers published over the last 130 years. Manipulation of this file produced 5 catalogs and 150 maps.

Catalog 1 lists alphabetically species names with publication and locality information as recorded in the literature (i.e. unsynonomized). Catalog 2 lists alphabetically synonomized species names with publication and locality information. Catalogs 3 and 4 list alphabetically all unsynonomized and synonomized species names, respectively. Catalog 5 lists synonomized species names by increasing latitude and longitude.

During the last 130 years, 1303 names have been used to record benthic foraminifera off the North American Atlantic Coast. Through synonomization this number was reduced to 876 of which 149 occur at 20 or more of the 542 sample sites. Computer-generated maps were drawn for these 149 most commonly recorded species.

Species were grouped by depth and geographic distribution through examination of the maps. Seven species are coastal in their distribution, 71 occur mainly at depths of less than 200 m, 41 at depths of greater than 200 m, and 30 are ubiquitous. Thirteen species alter their depth distribution with latitude.

Geographically, the species group into 6 categories. Thirty-one species occur from Florida to Cape Hatteras, 26 from Cape Hatteras to Cape Cod, 4 from Cape Cod to Newfoundland, 22 from Florida to Cape Cod, 40 from Cape Hatteras to Newfoundland, and 26 are ubiquitous. Because of the overlapping distribution of the species, no simple boundaries can be drawn for faunal provinces. We recognize two major overlapping faunal provinces: a northern province from Newfoundland to Cape Hatteras and a southern province from Florida to Cape Cod.


Distribution of Recent Benthic Foraminifera off the North American Pacific Coast from California to Baja
Stephen J. Culver and Martin A. Buzas
479 pages, 765 figures, 14 tables
1986 (Date of Issue: 29 December 1986)
Number 28, Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences
DOI: 10.5479/si.01960768.28.1
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Abstract

A computer file of all published distributional data (presence or absence) on the recent, living and dead benthic foraminifera off the North American Pacific Coast (California and Baja California) was constructed from 89 papers published since 1896. Manipulation of this file produced 5 catalogs and 131 maps.

Catalog 1 lists alphabetically species names with publication and locality information as recorded in the literature (i.e., unsynonymized). Catalog 2 lists synonymized species names with publication and locality information. Catalogs 3 and 4 list alphabetically all unsynonymized and synonymized species names, respectively. Catalog 5 lists synonymized names by increasing latitude and longitude.

During the past 90 years, 1117 names have been used to record benthic foraminifera in the study area. Through synonymization, this number was reduced to 798, of which 130 occur at 35 or more of the 875 sample localities. Computer-generated maps were drawn for the 130 most commonly recorded species.

Species were grouped by depth and geographic (latitudinal) distributions through visual examination of the maps. Sixty-five species are restricted to depths of less than 200 m, 45 occur mainly at depths of less than 2000 m, 2 only at depths of greater than 200 m, and 18 are ubiquitous with depth. The depth distribution for many species changes with latitude, but this may be due to a poor sampling framework.

Latitudinally, the species are grouped into seven categories. Forty-two species are latitudinally ubiquitous to the study area (Cape Mendocino to Cape San Lucas and the Gulf of California), 52 species occur from Point Conception to Cape San Lucas and in the Gulf of California, 5 species range from Point Conception to Punta Eugenia and are also found in the Gulf of California, 5 species occur from Cape San Lucas to Punta Eugenia and in the Gulf of California, 5 species range from Cape Mendocino to Cape San Lucas, 10 species range from Cape Mendocino to Punta Eugenia, and 11 species occur from Point Conception to Punta Eugenia. A major faunal break occurs at Point Conception.


Distribution of Recent Benthic Foraminifera off the North American Pacific Coast from Oregon to Alaska
Stephen J. Culver and Martin A. Buzas
iii, 234 p. , maps
1985 (Date of Issue: 30 August 1985)
Number 26, Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences
DOI: 10.5479/si.01960768.26.1
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Abstract

A computer file of all published distributional data (presence or absence) on the living and dead recent benthic foraminifera off the North American Pacific Coast (Oregon to Alaska) was constructed from 31 papers published since 1886. Manipulation of this file produced 5 catalogs and 139 maps.

Catalog 1 lists alphabetically species names with publication and locality information as recorded in the literature (i.e., unsynonymized). Catalog 2 lists synonymized species names with publication and locality information. Catalogs 3 and 4 list alphabetically all unsynonymized and synonymized species names, respectively. Catalog 5 lists synonymized names by increasing latitude and longitude.

During the past 100 years, 523 names have been used to record benthic foraminifera in the study area. Through synonymization, this number was reduced to 404, of which 138 occur at 6 or more of the 157 sample localities. Computer-generated maps were drawn for the 138 most commonly recorded species.

Species were grouped by depth and geographic (latitudinal) distribution through visual examination of the maps. Eight species are coastal in their distribution, 63 occur mainly at depths of less than 200 m, 27 at depths greater than 200 m, and 40 are ubiquitous with depth. Many species appear to alter their depth distribution with latitude, but this may be due to a poor sampling framework.

Latitudinally, the species are grouped into three categories. Forty-two species occur mainly to the north of 52°-55°N, 22 species occur mainly to the south of 52°-55°N, and 74 species are latitudinally ubiquitous within the area of study. This preliminary analysis indicates a possible faunal break in the region of Queen Charlotte Island.


Distribution of Recent Benthic Foraminifera off the Pacific Coast of Mexico and Central America
Stephen J. Culver and Martin A. Buzas
187 pages, 166 figures, 3 maps, 109 tables
1987 (Date of Issue: 10 September 1987)
Number 30, Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences
DOI: 10.5479/si.01960768.30.1
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Abstract

A computer file of all published distributional data (presence or absence) on the recent, living and dead benthic foraminifera off the Mexican and Central American Pacific coast was constructed from 21 papers published since 1896. Manipulation of this file produced 5 catalogs and 115 maps.

Catalog 1 lists alphabetically species names with publication and locality information as recorded in the literature (i.e., unsynonymized). Catalog 2 lists synonymized species names with publication and locality information. Catalogs 3 and 4 list alphabetically all unsynonymized and synonymized species names, respectively. Catalog 5 lists synonymized names by increasing latitude and longitude.

Over the past 90 years, 447 names have been used to record benthic foraminifera in the study area. Through synonymization, this number was reduced to 377, of which 114 occur at 5 or more of the 119 sample localities. Computer-generated maps were drawn for the 114 most commonly recorded species.

Species were grouped by depth and geographic (latitudinal) distribution through visual examination of the maps. Thirty-two species are restricted to depths of less than 200 m, 22 occur mainly at depths of less than 2000 m, 22 at depths of greater than 200 m, 5 at depths of greater than 2000 m, 11 are found between 200 and 2000 m, and 22 are ubiquitous with depth.

Latitudinally, the species are grouped into three categories. Sixty-six species are latitudinally ubiquitous in the study area, 47 species are found only to the south of Puerto Angel (16°N) and one species is found only north of Puerto Angel. Although the majority of species are ubiquitous, a faunal break is probably indicated by the species restricted to the south of Puerto Angel.


The Distributional Ecology and Zoogeographical Relationships of Stomatopod Crustacea from Pacific Costa Rica
Marjorie L. Reaka and Raymond B. Manning
iii, 29 pages
1980 (Date of Issue: 7 October 1980)
Number 7, Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences
DOI: 10.5479/si.01960768.7.1
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Abstract

Twenty species of stomatopod crustaceans, primarily shallow-water forms, are recorded from Costa Rican localities. Earlier records for size, depth distribution, habitat, and latitudinal distribution are summarized for each species. Habitat use and co-occurrence of species are analyzed, and the zoogeographical relationships of East Pacific species are discussed.


The Echinoderm Fauna of Ascension Island, South Atlantic Ocean
David L. Pawson
115 pages, Vol. 10, 4 figures, 12 plates, 5
1978 (Date of Issue: 1 May 1978)
Number 2, Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences
DOI: 10.5479/si.01960768.2.1
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Two recent intertidal collecting expeditions and existing museum collections have added much to knowledge of the Ascension Island echinoderm fauna. Twenty-five species are now known from Ascension; eight are new records. One new species, Holothuria (Halodeima) manningi, and one new subspecies, Echinometra lucunter polypora, are described. Diadema ascensionis Mortensen is regarded as a subspecies of D. antillarum Philippi, and Pseudoboletia atlantica H. L. Clark is regarded as a subspecies of P. maculata Troschel.

The echinoderm fauna of Ascension Island includes 8 amphi-Atlantic species, 3 western Atlantic species, 4 eastern Atlantic species, 5 circumtropical species, 4 species shared only with St. Helena, and I endemic species. There are in addition three endemic subspecies. Twelve species are shared with St. Helena, and both islands are closely similar in terms of numbers and relationships of their faunal components. Colonization of both islands by planktonic larval stages is suggested. Dendrochirotid holothurians, which lack such larval stages, are not represented at either St. Helena or Ascension. The structure of the Ascension fauna seems to have been determined by vagaries of ocean surface and subsurface currents. In contrast, Bermuda, which sits astride the Gulf Stream, has a fauna that is entirely typical of the West Indian region to the the south.


Foraminiferal Densities and Pore Water Chemistry in the Indian River, Florida
Martin A. Buzas and Kenneth P. Severin
iii, 38 p. : ill.
1993 (Date of Issue: 19 May 1993)
Number 36, Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences
DOI: 10.5479/si.01960768.36.1
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Abstract

Two stations were established about 10 m apart at a depth of about 1 m at Link Port, Florida. One consisted of quartz sand and the other of quartz sand with a dense stand of seagrass. At the surface of each station and at a depth of 10 cm at the grass site, four replicate samples consisting of 5 ml each were taken every fortnight from 27 March to 6 November 1978 (17 sampling times, 204 samples). The taxa Quinqueloculina, Elphidium, Ammonia, Bolivina, and Ammobaculites comprising 98% of the fauna were enumerated. In addition, pore water chemistry was measured for temperature, salinity, oxygen, pH, Eh, NH3, PO4, Si, NO2, and NO2, + NO3.

General linear models were used to analyze the bare surface-grass surface, and grass surface-grass 10 cm data sets. Foraminiferal densities were evaluated for differences between sites, periodicity, sites × periodicity (interaction), and environmental variables.

Differences in overall density between the bare surface-grass surface sites were not significant for the three most abundant taxa (Quinqueloculina, Elphidium, and Ammonia). At the grass site the density for all taxa were significantly lower at 10 cm than at the surface (very few individuals were observed at 10 cm).

Hypotheses for periodicity and interaction were significant for all taxa in all comparisons except for Bolivina in the bare surface-grass surface analysis. At the bare surface, maximum densities occurred in spring while at the grass surface in summer. Although densities were low at 10 cm, no synchronization between the grass surface and 10 cm was evident.

The environmental variables were significant for all taxa in both comparisons. The environmental variables are, however, highly correlated. To alleviate this difficulty, a principal component analysis was performed on these variables. The first three components included all of the 10 variables. Subsequent multiple regression of foramineferal densities and the principal components indicated that usually at least two components, accounting for most of the variables, were statistically significant. Thus, no simple relationship between pore water chemistry and density is apparent. The very large difference in density between the grass surface and 10 cm depth is much more strongly related to the pore water chemistry than the smaller differences with time at the surface sites.


The Genus Caulerpa from Central Visayas, Philippines
Ernani G. Menez and Hilconida P. Calumpong
427 pages, 11 figures, 8 maps
1982 (Date of Issue: 5 October 1982)
Number 17, Smithsonian Contributions to the Marine Sciences
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Abstract

This taxonomic study of Caulerpa shows 20 taxa occurring in Central Visayas, Philipines, including Caulerpa reyesii, new species. Of these, three are newly reported from the Philippines and seven taxa are new records from Central Visayas.


Displaying 11 - 20 from the 41 total records