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Displaying 31 - 40 from the 97 total records
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Permian Brachiopods of West Texas, V
G. Arthur Cooper and Richard E. Grant
551 pages, 1 figure, 118 plates
1976 (Date of Issue: 15 October 1976)
Number 24, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810266.24.1
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Abstract

The fifth of a six-part monograph on the brachiopods and Permian stratigraphy of the Glass Mountains and other ranges in western Texas and adjacent areas, this volume completes the systematic and descriptive part of the monograph with a discussion of the punctate groups. The Order Rhipidomellida contains 1 genus in the superfamily Rhipidomellacea, 4 in the Enteletacea, 1 in the Rhynchoporcea, 11 in the Spiriferinacea, and 2 in the Retziacea. The greatest number of species in this volume belong to the Order Terebratulida, contained in 19 genera.


Triassic Echinoids
Porter M. Kier
88 pages, 16 figures, 21 plates, 2 tables
1977 (Date of Issue: 28 January 1977)
Number 30, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810266.30.1
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Abstract

Although 142 species of Triassic echinoids have been reported, only 24 are based on sufficient material to permit reliable generic identification. These species are redescribed and illustrated. Twelve of them are from the St. Cassian Beds in the Italian Dolomites. A large collection of specimens from these beds is described, from which are erected two new species, Megaporocidaris mariana and Levicidaris zardinia, and five new genera: Zardinechinus, a miocidarid, Paurocidaris and Leurocidaris, cidarids, and the psychocidarids, Levicidaris and Megaporocidaris. A new pedinoid, Hemipedina hudsoni, is described from the Norian of Arabia. During the Early and Middle Triassic, only flexible miocidarids were present. Apparently all Mesozoic echinoids are descended from them. The first cidarids occur in the Late Triassic (Karnian) together with the first psychocidarids. The first certain pedinoid appears in the Norian. Finally at the close of the Triassic, in the Rhaetian, the first hemicidaroid appears.


Ecology and Systematics of Foraminifera in Two Thalassia Habitats, Jamaica, West Indies
Martin A. Buzas, Roberta K. Smith and Kenneth A. Beem
139 pages, 38 figures, 8 plates, 34 tables
1977 (Date of Issue: 11 July 1977)
Number 31, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810266.31.1
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Abstract

Homogeneous Thalassia beds in back-reef flat (less than 1 m) and Discovery Bay (about 3 m) were sampled for 12 successive months in Jamaica, West Indies. Living foraminifera were enumerated in each of four monthly replicates consisting of 20 ml of sediment. At the sampling times, water temperature, sediment temperature, salinity, oxygen saturation, water pH, sediment pH, sediment median, sediment sorting, turbidity, particulate organic carbon, Thalassia weight, and weight percent silt plus clay were measured.

In all, 18,644 individuals belonging to 143 species were picked, sorted, and identified. The back-reef flat habitat contained 7,745 individuals belonging to 115 species, while the Discovery Bay contained 10,899 individuals belonging to 117 species. Fisher's log-series fits the distribution of species abundances at both habitats well. The number of species, information function, and equitability are usually greater at Discovery Bay for individual 20 ml samples.

A general linear model consisting of parameters for station differences, overall periodicity, interaction of station differences and overall periodicity, and environmental variables was constructed. The densities of the 19 most abundant species were statistically analyzed individually (univariate) and simultaneously (multivariate).

Univariate analyses indicate six species have significant station differences (95% level) and seven exhibit periodicity. The environmental variables are not significant for any of the species. Multivariate analyses indicate a significant difference between stations and an overall periodicity. As in the univariate analyses, environmental variables are not significant. The results suggest that in tropical habitats changes in species densities are regulated biotically.

The new species Ammonia jacksoni, Elphidium norvangi, Fissurina goreaui, Discorbinella minuta, Glabratella altispira and G. compressa are described. Taxonomic remarks are presented for most of the species.


Evolution of Oblitacythereis from Paleocosta (Ostracoda: Trachyleberididae) during the Cenozoic in the Mediterranean and Atlantic
Richard H. Benson
47 pages, 11 figures, 4 plates
1977 (Date of Issue: 29 August 1977)
Number 33, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810266.33.1
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Abstract

A new ostracode genus Oblitacythereis containing two new subgenera (the nominotypical form and the older Paleoblitacythereis) containing two new species (O. (O.) mediterranea and O. (P.) luandaensis) and one old species (new designation, O. (P.) ruggierii (Russo)) have been demonstrated to have descended from a common ancestral stock (new genus Paleocosta) of the genus Costa, the nominate form of the tribe Costini.

This genus contains heavily costate species whose history has been one of invasion of the greater depths of Tethys, which became thermospheric in the middle Miocene. Species of subgenus Paleoblitacythereis became adapted to upper slope and warm basinal habitats and underwent considerable modification of its carapace structure. When Tethys became extinct as a marine environment at the end of the Miocene, subgenus Paleoblitacythereis was eradicated in the Mediterranean region but survived in the Atlantic, where it lives today. Its descendant subgenus Oblitacythereis invaded the newly formed Mediterranean in the Early Pliocene, structurally modified to live in cooler water.

The history of Oblitacythereis was traceable because of a detailed analysis of structural and form homology, substantiated by quantitative Theta-Rho test.


Permian Brachiopods of West Texas, VI
G. Arthur Cooper and Richard E. Grant
210 pages, 3 tables
1977 (Date of Issue: 6 October 1977)
Number 32, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810266.32.1
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Abstract

The sixth and final part of a monograph of Permian strata and faunas of West Texas and adjacent parts of New Mexico, this volume consists primarily of faunal lists and a taxonomic index of the previous five parts. A list of brachiopods grouped according to R. E. King's localities and compiled from King's data by the authors is followed by the author's compilation of lists of brachiopods found at the localities designated by the United States Geological Survey, the American Museum of Natural History, Kansas University, and the National Museum of Natural History. The list pertaining to the last three groups of localities carries a code indicating the approximate number of specimens of each taxon in the museum collections. A list of the authors' collection of ammonites is included, followed by lists of their fusulinids; these are appended to this monograph on brachiopods because they have important implications for dating and correlation. Also included are Corrigenda (with reference to the previously published parts) and suggestions for future related research.


A Lower Eocene Frigatebird from the Green River Formation of Wyoming (Pelecaniformes: Fregatidae)
Storrs L. Olson
33 pages, 31 figures
1977 (Date of Issue: 7 October 1977)
Number 35, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810266.35.1
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Abstract

A new subfamily, Limnofregatinae, is erected for the first known Tertiary specimens of the pelecaniform family Fregatidae. These are described as a new genus and species, Limnofregata azygosternon. The holotype is a nearly complete skeleton with feather impressions. Two additional specimens, consisting of a partial skeleton and a fragment of ulna, are referred to the same species. All are from freshwater lake deposits in the Lower Eocene Green River Formation of Wyoming, which are roughly 50 million years old. The principal differences between Limnofregata and modern frigatebirds (Fregata) are seen in its shorter and less hooked rostrum, proportionately shorter wings and longer hindlimb, in the lack of fusion in the pectoral girdle, and in the lack of extensive pneumatization of the skeleton. The fossilform is, nevertheless, well advanced along the lines of modern frigatebirds and nothing in its morphology seems to preclude its being ancestral to Fregata. The fossil provides additional support for placing the suborder Fregatae between the more primitive tropicbirds (suborder Phaethontes) and the members of the suborder Pelecani. Frigatebirds in the early Tertiary evidently occupied different habitats or a wider range of habitats than the modern forms and have only subsequently been restricted to a purely oceanic environment.


Index of Living and Fossil Echinoids 1924-1970
Porter M. Kier and Mary Hurd Lawson
182 pages
1978 (Date of Issue: 10 February 1978)
Number 34, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810266.34.1
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Abstract

All new taxa of fossil and living echinoids described from 1924 to 1970 are listed with their age, geographic and stratigraphic occurrence, and bibliographic citation.


Tertiary and Quaternary Brachiopods from the Southwest Pacific
G. Arthur Cooper
23 pages, 4 figures, 2 plates
1978 (Date of Issue: 15 December 1978)
Number 38, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810266.38.1
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Abstract

Brachiopods from Tertiary and Quaternary sediments in the islands of the South Pacific are rarities. They are important in helping us to understand the geographic and geologic distribution and evolution of parts of the phylum. This paper describes genera and species from Fiji, Java, and the New Hebrides. All except two of the genera live in the South Pacific today but are rare, absent, or not yet taken from the waters surrounding Fiji and the New Hebrides: Craniscus?, Cryptopora, Basiliola, Terebratulina, Abyssothyris, Dallithyris?, Argyrotheca, Platidia, Frenulina, Dallina, and Thecidellina. The exceptions are: an extinct new genus, here named Dicrosia, and Lacazella, a genus common in the Mediterranean, less common in the Caribbean, but not now known to be living in the Pacific.


Tertiary and Cretaceous Brachiopods from Cuba and the Caribbean
G. Arthur Cooper
45 pages, 2 figures, 7 plates, 1 table
1979 (Date of Issue: 30 January 1979)
Number 37, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810266.37.1
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Abstract

Thirty-nine taxa of fossil brachiopods are described, figured, and discussed. Three come from Cretaceous rocks of Cuba and the remainder were found in Tertiary sediments of Cuba and other parts of the Caribbean region. These range in age from Eocene to Pliocene. Fourteen genera are identified of which two are new: one from the Cretaceous and the other from the Eocene, both from Cuba.

Thirty species are recognized among the fossil genera: Cruralina, 1 (new); Terebratulina, 1 (new); Tichosina, 2 new; Tichosina?, 3 (1 new); Stenosarina, 1 (new); Gryphus, 4 (2 new); Gryphus?, 1; Dyscritothyris, 1 (new genus and species); Argyrotheca, 12 (11 new); Cistellarcula, 1 (new); Hercothyris, 2 (new genus and 2 new species); Lacazella, 1. Representatives of the following genera are not identified specifically: Cryptopora, Rugia, Terebratulina, Platidia, Argyrotheca, Thecidellina.


Taxonomy and Paleoecology of Early Miocene Benthic Foraminifera of Northern New Zealand and the North Tasman Sea
Bruce W. Hayward and Martin A. Buzas
154 pages, 26 figures, 28 plates, 4 tables
1979 (Date of Issue: 3 August 1979)
Number 36, Smithsonian Contributions to Paleobiology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810266.36.1
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Abstract

Data from 51 samples of early Miocene benthic foraminifera (200-300 individuals per sample) from west Northland, New Zealand (Waitakere and Waitemata Groups), together with those from four samples from the north Tasman sea (Deep Sea Drilling Project 206), are analysed by multidimensional scaling and cluster analysis. The samples are grouped in terms of species abundances into six thanatotopes, which are interpreted as follows: A, dominated by robust Amphistegina madagascariensis, 10%-37% planktonics, inner neritic; B, Cibicides-Cibicidoides dominant, 10%-55% planktonics, outer neritic; C, Gyroidina, Euuvigerina, Astrononion, Lenticulina most abundant, 32%-87% planktonics, upper bathyal; D, Cassidulina-Bolivina-Cibicides dominant, 16%-99.5% planktonics, upper and midbathyal; E, Globocassidulina-Epistominella dominant, 99.5% planktonics, lower bathyal; F, Quinqueloculina dominant, 11%-32% planktonics, inner and midneritic.

Using these thanatotope interpretations in conjunction with their stratigraphic and geographic distributons, a model of the early Miocene paleogeography of west Northland is deduced, refining traditional models for the area. A central mid-bathyal basin (Waitemata Basin), bounded in the southwest by a pile of volcanic sediments (Waitakere volcanic pile), built up to an island surrounded by neritic and upper bathyal slopes. In the northwest (Kaipara area) volcanics erupted through a neritic shelf. This shelf became shallower and partly terrestrial during latter parts of the early Miocene. Upper bathyal slopes existed around the southern edge of the northwestern shelf. Submarine canyons cut through these slopes channeling shelf sediment into the bathyal basin. Several ungrouped, greatly mixed samples (interbedded with basin sediments) contain individuals from neritic and bathyal thanatotopes and are interpreted as having been mixed during transportation down through the canyons into the basin in the form of subaqueous sediment gravity flows.

No change in depth from the present lower bathyal is inferred to have occurred in the vicinity of DSDP 206 (north Tasman Sea) since the early Miocene.

All 378 identified species are listed together with their synonomies; many are described and 194 species are figured. Besides a number of first records for New Zealand, three new species—Elphidium gibsoni, Elphidium kanoum, and Eoeponidella scotti—are described.


Displaying 31 - 40 from the 97 total records