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Displaying 21 - 30 from the 644 total records
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Ten Rhyparus from the Western Hemisphere (Coleoptera: Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae)
Oscar L. Cartwright and Robert E. Woodruff
20 pages, 15 figures
1969 (Date of Issue: 6 November 1969)
Number 21, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.21
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

This is the first report of the genus Rhyparus (Coleoptera; Scarabaeidae: Aphodiinae) being found in the Western Hemisphere. It is closely related to Termitodius, a genus known from Costa Rica, Panama, and Colombia, but easily recognized by characters given. One South American species from Bolivia is transferred from Termitodius and nine new species are described and illustrated as follows: Rhyparus spangleri from Costa Rica; opacus from Mexico;blantoni from Panama; suspiciosus from Costa Rica; mexicanus from Mexico and Costa Rica; zayasi from Cuba and Jamaica; sculpturatus from Costa Rica; isidroi from Costa Rica; and costaricensis from Costa Rica and Mexico.


A Revision of the Melanesian Wasps of the Genus Cerceris Latreille (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae)
Karl V. Krombein
36 pages, 23 figures
1969 (Date of Issue: 19 December 1969)
Number 22, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.22
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

In the Melanesian area, wasps of the sphecid genus Cerceris Latreille are known only from New Guinea and its offshore islands, the Bismarck Archipelago and Solomon Islands. Keys, descriptions, and illustrations are presented in this revisionary study of the following taxa: female, male Cerceris pictiventris gimmolator Smith, 1864; female C. cristovalensis, new species; female C. cyclops, new species; female C. papuensis, new species; female C. misoolensis, new species; female, male C. karimuiensis, new species; male C. brandti, new species; female, male C. millironi millironi, new subspecies; female C. millironi tulagiensis, new subspecies; male C. millironi malaitensis, new subspecies; female, male C. reicula, new species; female, male C. minuscula sculleniana, new subspecies; female C. minuscula stanleyensis, new subspecies; male C. minuscula korovensis, new subspecies; female C. vechti, new species; female, male C. venusta oceanica Brèthes, 1920, new status (=C. insulicola Tsuneki, 1968, new synonymy); female, male C. venusta keiensis Strand, 1911, new status; female, male C. venusta atrescens, new subspecies; female C. mordax, new species; female C. toxopeusi, new species; female C. vellensis vellensis, new subspecies; female, male C. vellensis obrieni, new subspecies; female, male C. vellensis fordi, new subspecies; female C. vellensis segiensis, new subspecies; female, male C. bougainvillensis solomonis, new subspecies; female, male C. bougainvillensis lavellensis, new subspecies; female, male C. bougainvillensis novogeorgica, new subspecies; and C. bougainvillensis bougainvillensis Tsuneki, 1968, new status.


Bredin-Archbold-Smithsonian Biological Survey of Dominica: The Phoridae of Dominica (Diptera)
Thomas Borgmeier
69 pages, 152 figures
1969 (Date of Issue: 18 November 1969)
Number 23, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.23
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Abstract

Recent collecting by J. F. G. Clarke, O. S. Flint, Jr., R. J. Gagné, P. Spangler, T. J. Spilman, G. C. Steyskal, and W. W. Wirth for the Bredin-Archbold-Smithsonian Biological Survey of Dominica resulted in a small but representative collection of phorid flies, comprising 16 genera and 82 species, 43 of which are new. Of the latter, 32 belong to the giant genus Megaselia. One new species from Costa Rica has been added: Pachyneurella haplopyga.


Ostracoda in Texas Bays and Lagoons: An Ecologic Study
Charles E. King and Louis S. Kornicker
92 pages, 15 figures, 21 plates, 19 tables
1970 (Date of Issue: 25 March 1970)
Number 24, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.24
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Ostracods were collected monthly for about one year in Copano Bay, Redfish Bay, and the Laguna Madre, Texas, along a salinity gradient that ranged from 9.7 to 50.0 parts per thousand. This study describes the ostracods encountered and analyzes the environmental factors influencing their distribution.


A Monographic Study of the Mexican Species of Enlinia (Diptera: Dolichopodidae)
Harold Robinson
62 pages, 221 figures
1969 (Date of Issue: 6 November 1969)
Number 25, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.25
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Fifty-three species are recorded for Mexico, including Enlinia ciliata Robinson previously known from the southeastern United States and 52 previously undescribed. The newly described species are placed in 20 groups as follows: I. E. elegans (closely related to the type-species, E. magistri (Aldrich) of the United States, E. ornata, E. anomalipennis, E. lobata, E. plumicauda, E. crinita, E. interrupta, E. maculata, E. obovata (last two similar to E. sordida (Aldrich) of the West Indies); II. E. marginata; III. (E. ciliata group) E. convergens, E. albipes; IV. E. femorata, E. cristata; V. E. armata, E. fusca, E. distincta, E. hirtitarsis, E. fasciata, E. setosa; VI. E. flavicornis; VII. E. tibialis; VIII. E. elongata, E. chaetophora; IX. E. halteralis; X. E. montana, E. angustifacies, E. maxima, E. latifacies, E. media; XI. E. scutitarsis; XII. E. seticauda, E. ramosa (last also reported from Panama); XIII. E. magnicornis; XIV. E. hirtipes, E. clavulifera, E. fimbriata; XV. E. ventralis, E. brevipes; XVI. E. nigricans; XVII. E. acuticornis, E. frontalis; XVIII. E. caudata; XIX. E. lamellata, XX. E. simplex, E. unisetosa, E. brachychaeta, E. scabrida, E. latipennis, E. seriata, E. ciliifemorata, and E. exigua. General observations include the trends toward spectacularly ornate male wings, legs, abdominal sternites, and genitalia and the preference for sunlight in group I; the simple structure and preference for shade of group XX; preference for soil rather than rock substrates of group III; occurrence on relatively dry substrates of group V; the relatively large size of species of groups VIII and X, and the apparent restriction of group X to higher elevations where other groups do not occur.


The Avifauna of Northern Latin America: A Symposium Held at the Smithsonian Institution 13-15 April 1966
Helmut K. Buechner and Jimmie H. Buechner, editors
119 pages, 4 figures
1970 (Date of Issue: 3 April 1970)
Number 26, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.26
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Abstract

This conference was conceived by William Vogt, who is well known for his early concern with the ecological consequences of the human population explosion, as expressed in his book Road to Survival (New York: William Sloane Associates, 1948). Over three decades of field observation in Latin America have provided him with a view of environmental changes, particularly the destruction of forest vegetation, that few other scholars have experienced. The conference was convened to determine, through an exchange of information, whether the drastic modification and elimination of the wintering habitat of many breeding birds of North America may be responsible for depressed levels of populations.

The assemblage of most of the outstanding scholars of bird life in Central America, Colombia, and Venezuela at the Smithsonian Institution resulted in a remarkable accumulation of information and exchange of ideas. Fourteen individual papers were presented, each of which was followed by discussion. Further discussion took place in a plenary session after the papers on the individual countries. In lieu of resolutions the conferees agreed on a series of suggestions which are presented in these proceedings.

The conference was organized by the Smithsonian Office of Ecology, and made possible by a generous grant from the Conservation Foundation.

We would like to express our gratitude to Paul Slud, Associate Curator, Division of Birds, National Museum of Natural History, for verifying the spelling of scientific names and for his considerable assistance with the final editing.

The Editors


The Tenrecs: A Study in Mammalian Behavior and Evolution
J. F. Eisenberg and Edwin Gould
137 pages, 77 figures, 13 tables
1970 (Date of Issue: 9 March 1970)
Number 27, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.27
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Tenrecs are found only on the island of Madagascar. The biology of the Tenrecidae is described by field and laboratory studies that focused on comparisons of social behavior and communication in several species. Detailed observations on the behavior of Echinops, Setifer, Tenrec, Hemicentetes, and Microgale are related to ecological adaptations of each genus.

Experimental manipulations of Hemicentetes revealed that a sound-producing organ composed of dorsal quills functions to coordinate the movements of mother and infants. Evolutionary trends in structure and behavior of the tenrecs are discussed. The mammalian feeding niches of Panama and Madagascar are compared.


Some Behavior Patterns of Platyrrhine Monkeys, II. Saguinus geoffroyi and Some Other Tamarins
M. Moynihan
77 pages, 25 figures, 1 table
1970 (Date of Issue: 15 April 1970)
Number 28, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.28
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

The Rufous-naped Tamarin, Saguinus geoffroyi, is a rather small species of Panama and northern Colombia. It is diurnal, slightly gregarious, omnivorous (with a preference for insects), quadrupedal, and most characteristic of dense scrub and low forest in areas of medium humidity. It interacts with some other species in peculiar ways which may involve social mimicry. It has a few tactile and olfactory signals, a moderate number of vocalizations, and many kinds of visual signals, mostly displays. The communication systems of other members of the genus seem to be similar. They all include points of resemblance to both the Night Monkey, Aotus, and the marmosets, Callithrix and Cebuella. Some of the resemblances are difficult to interpret. The phylogenetic relationships among the three types, and between them and Callicebus, remain thoroughly obscure. There must have been considerable parallel or convergent evolution of either behavioral or morphological characters during the history of the group.


Deep-Sea Cerviniidae (Copepoda: Harpacticoida) from the Western Indian Ocean, Collected with R/V Anton Bruun, in 1964
F. D. Por
60 pages, 182 figures, 1 table
1969 (Date of Issue: 6 November 1969)
Number 29, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.29
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Abstract

The Cerviniidae found in abyssal and bathyal catches of Cruise 8 of R/V Anton Bruun are discussed. In eight stations off the East African Coast 15 species of Cerviniidae have been found. The genus Pontostratiotes Brady is represented by six new species, by specimens which belong probably to the three previously known species of the genus, and an as yet uncertain species. A new genus is established for Ameliotes malagassicus, new genus, new species. Two other new species belong to the genera Cerviniella Smirnov and Cerviniopsis Sars. Two other species found in the collections of Vityaz from the Pacific abyssal are found also in this material. The genus Pontostratiotes is discussed, and a new diagnosis of the genus is given.

Adequate gear yielded rich collections of abyssal Harpacticoids of which the present material is only a small part. A few general conclusions about this fauna are advanced.


The Nearctic Species of Orgilus Haliday (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)
Carl F. W. Muesebeck
104 pages, 57 figures
1970 (Date of Issue: 20 February 1970)
Number 30, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.30
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

The species of the braconid genus Orgilus are all internal parasites of lepidopterous larvae, principally of the larvae of Microlepidoptera; some have been employed in the biological control of troublesome pest species. The number of different kinds seems to be very great. In the present paper 107 Nearctic species are treated, all except 16 of these previously undescribed. Keys to the genera considered as comprising the subfamily Orgilinae and to the species of Orgilus recognized in the paper are followed by detailed descriptions of the species.


Displaying 21 - 30 from the 644 total records