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Displaying 31 - 40 from the 644 total records
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Taxonomy, Sexual Dimorphism, Vertical Distribution, and Evolutionary Zoogeography of the Bathypelagic Fish Genus Stomias (Stomiatidae)
Robert H. Gibbs, Jr.
25 pages, 6 figures, 15 tables
1969 (Date of Issue: 2 December 1969)
Number 31, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.31
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

New information on the characters and geographic distribution and a key for identification are presented for the ten recognized species and subspecies of Stomias, of which one, the eastern Atlantic subspecies S. colubrinus orientalis Blache, is considered a full species and is redescribed. The name orientalis, a junior homonym, is replaced by lampropeltis. External sexual dimorphism is demonstrated for all species in three characters: males are smaller than females and have larger eyes and larger postorbital photophores. The magnitude of the dimorphism varies among the species, the most extreme differences in eye and postorbital organ occurring in species in which males attain the least maximum size. Vertical distributions of all except S. danae are estimated by comparing numbers of specimens caught in nonclosing nets with the number of meter-hours of trawling at depth in the known geographic range of each form. All appear to migrate from deeper to shallower depths at night. Most species for which data approach adequacy occur in the greatest abundance between 500-1000 meters during daylight and in the upper 200 meters at night, although concentrations of S. gracilis are deeper than 200 meters at night. In S. colubrinus, however, greatest daytime catches are below 1000 meters and at night below 600 meters. The apparent phylogenetic trends of morphological characters, together with present geographical distributions, suggest that S. brevibarbatus and S. danae represent the earliest evolved stock of Stomias, from which, perhaps simultaneously, the colubrinus-lampropeltis group and S. nebulosus arose. The S. boa group probably arose from nebulosus-like ancestors, with the almost circumtropical S. affinis the earliest and giving rise to S. atriventer in the eastern Pacific and S. boa boa in the Subtropical Convergence, and the latter giving rise to S. gracilis in subantarctic and Antarctic waters and, most recently, to S. boa ferox in the North Atlantic as well as a Mediterranean population that has retained boa boa characteristics.


Ostracoda (Myodocopina) from the Peru-Chile Trench and the Antarctic Ocean
Louis S. Kornicker
42 pages, 25 figures
1970 (Date of Issue: 11 February 1970)
Number 32, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.32
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Myodocopid ostracods collected on cruise 11 of the RV Anton Bruun to the Peru-Chile Trench in 1965 are described, including four new species. Also described are two new species of the genus Spinacopia from Antarctica collected in 1964 on cruises 11 and 12 of the RV Eltanin. A supplementary description is given of the holotype of Azygocypridina imperator (Brady, 1880), the type-species of the genus.


A Checklist of the American Bidessini (Coleoptera: Dytiscidae-Hydroporinae)
Frank N. Young
5 pages
1969 (Date of Issue: 25 November 1969)
Number 33, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.33
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Abstract

A list of the American water beetles of tribe Bidessini (Dytiscidae-Hydroporinae). Type-species are listed for each genus with references to the original designations.


Sublittoral Gammaridea (Amphipoda) of the Hawaiian Islands
J. Laurens Barnard
286 pages, 180 figures, 6 tables
1970 (Date of Issue: 15 April 1970)
Number 34, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.34
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Gammaridean Amphipoda from depths of 0-30 m on hard bottoms are increased from about 40 to about 120 species, including 59 new species and 9 new genera and subgenera. About half of the species is endemic. Nearly 70 percent of the faunule has come from archipelagoes to the southwest of Hawaii, but only 15 percent of the faunule is of tropicopolitan character. About 20 percent of the fauna has affinities with cool waters of the North Pacific. This is the first significant record of cool-water species of any marine group in Hawaii. Most of these species have a tubicolous ecology, suggesting that nestlers are less successful in completing the long journey from the cool waters of northern continents. All but three species with cool-water affinities have diverged specifically from their mainland ancestors and at least two require erection of new genera to describe their divergence. Other endemic genera of Hawaii have low affinities with tropical Pacific faunas and have affinities with places like Antarctica, the Caribbean Sea, and warm-temperate Australia. The tropical component of Hawaiian Gammaridea is not impoverished by a priori standards of diversity. Few elements expected to occur in Hawaii are missing. No evidence of interisland adaptive radiation has been observed, but several pairs and triads of species with sibling affinities are described as a result of successive waves of immigration of parent species. Since no cool-water stepping stones occur between Hawaii and cool mainland shores of the North Pacific, the divergent cool-water species of Hawaii probably reflect morphological changes occurring after one increment of isolation. Some of these fairly radical changes such as loss of palp articles, coalescence of urosomites, and possibly axial reversal of dominance in gnathopods are seen to be of lower conservative value than heretofore accorded. This upsets classifications in Atylidae, Dexaminidae, Aoridae, and Isaeidae to a significant degree.


Cranial and Bacular Variation in Populations of Spiny Rats of the Genus Proechimys (Rodentia: Echimyidae) from South America
Robert E. Martin
19 pages, 12 figures, 4 tables
1970 (Date of Issue: 30 January 1970)
Number 35, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.35
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Specimens of Proechimys from 12 localities in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, and Peru, were studied to assess the degree of variation in bacular, cranial, and dental morphology, and pelage. Coefficients of variation and Student's t values were computed for selected cranial measurements to evaluate intra- and interpopulation variation. Studies on tooth wear demonstrated considerable variation in dental occlusal pattern and suggested that taxonomic assignment based entirely on dental morphology may be misleading. Descriptions and illustrations of bacula from most localities indicate that these bones are highly variable in overall dimensions, but have common structural features at a particular locality. Most specimens are tentatively referred to Proechimys guyannensis, although P. canicollis, P. quadruplicatus, and P. steerei were also represented. Proechimys guyannensis is regarded as a highly variable species. It is suggested that subspecific delimitation may not adequately express the variation observable in this species.


A Review of the Genus Harpiosquilla (Crustacea, Stomatopoda), with Descriptions of Three New Species
Raymond B. Manning
41 pages, 43 figures, 1 table
1969 (Date of Issue: 31 December 1969)
Number 36, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.36
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Abstract

Available specimens of the large squillid Harpiosquilla from the collections of the Australian Museum, Sydney, and the Division of Crustacea, National Museum of Natural History, Smithsonian Institution, show that the genus comprises seven species; three of these species are newly described. The species of Harpiosquilla occur throughout the Indo-West Pacific region, from Japan and Australia westward to the Red Sea and South Africa; some species, particularly H. annandalei, H. harpax, and H. raphidea are widely distributed in the region whereas others, including H. indica, new species (India), H. japonica, new species (Japan), and H. stephensoni, new species (Australia), exhibit more limited distribution patterns. All available literature is summarized, and the descriptive accounts are accompanied by notes on biology, development, and distribution.


The Odonata of Dominica, British West Indies
Thomas W. Donnelly
20 pages, 27 figures
1970 (Date of Issue: 11 February 1970)
Number 37, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.37
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

The Odonata fauna of Dominica is, for the first time, treated in detail. Twenty-one species of dragonflies and damselflies are recorded with detailed locality records and ecological notes, and a key is provided to 37 species known or expected to occur in the Lesser Antilles. Scapanea archboldi, new species, is described, and the nymphs of Protoneura ailsa Donnelly and Argia concinna Rambur are described for the first time. Aeshna psilus Calvert and Telebasis sanguinalis Calvert are recorded from the Lesser Antilles for the first time.


Copepods Parasitic on Sharks from the West Coast of Florida
Roger F. Cressey
30 pages, 110 figures, 1 table
1970 (Date of Issue: 30 December 1970)
Number 38, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.38
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Thirty-one species of parasitic copepods were taken from sixteen species of sharks caught off Sarasota, Florida. Of these, the following are described as new: Alebion lobatus, Nesippus nana, Kroyeria longicauda, Kroyerina scottorum, and Nemesis spinulosus. It was noted that the spermatophore attached to females of Alebion serve as one of the best taxonomic characters for separating females of this genus.


Myodocopid Ostracoda (Cypridinacea) from the Philippine Islands
Louis S. Kornicker
32 pages, 18 figures, 5 tables
1970 (Date of Issue: 11 February 1970)
Number 39, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.39
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Abstract

Seven species (6 new) of myodocopid Ostracoda are described. These were collected in 1967 during an ecological survey jointly sponsored by the University of Hawaii and the Smithsonian Oceanographic Sorting Center.


A Field Guide to the Cidaroid Echinoids of the Northwestern Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea
Thomas Phelan
67 pages, 7 figures, 22 plates
1970 (Date of Issue: 10 March 1970)
Number 40, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.40
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Twelve species of cidaroid echinoids from the northwestern Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea are described, compared, illustrated, and keyed for identification. The first description of the denuded test of Histocidaris nuttingi Mortensen is presented. A lectotype and paralectotype are selected for Histocidaris sharreri (A. Agassiz). Poriocidaris purpurata (Wyville Thompson), previously known from the eastern Atlantic, is reported for the first time from the Caribbean Sea.


Displaying 31 - 40 from the 644 total records