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Displaying 31 - 40 from the 644 total records
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Cranial and Bacular Variation in Populations of Spiny Rats of the Genus Proechimys (Rodentia: Echimyidae) from South America
Robert E. Martin
19 pages, 12 figures, 4 tables
1970 (Date of Issue: 30 January 1970)
Number 35, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.35
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Specimens of Proechimys from 12 localities in Bolivia, Brazil, Colombia, and Peru, were studied to assess the degree of variation in bacular, cranial, and dental morphology, and pelage. Coefficients of variation and Student's t values were computed for selected cranial measurements to evaluate intra- and interpopulation variation. Studies on tooth wear demonstrated considerable variation in dental occlusal pattern and suggested that taxonomic assignment based entirely on dental morphology may be misleading. Descriptions and illustrations of bacula from most localities indicate that these bones are highly variable in overall dimensions, but have common structural features at a particular locality. Most specimens are tentatively referred to Proechimys guyannensis, although P. canicollis, P. quadruplicatus, and P. steerei were also represented. Proechimys guyannensis is regarded as a highly variable species. It is suggested that subspecific delimitation may not adequately express the variation observable in this species.


The Odonata of Dominica, British West Indies
Thomas W. Donnelly
20 pages, 27 figures
1970 (Date of Issue: 11 February 1970)
Number 37, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.37
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

The Odonata fauna of Dominica is, for the first time, treated in detail. Twenty-one species of dragonflies and damselflies are recorded with detailed locality records and ecological notes, and a key is provided to 37 species known or expected to occur in the Lesser Antilles. Scapanea archboldi, new species, is described, and the nymphs of Protoneura ailsa Donnelly and Argia concinna Rambur are described for the first time. Aeshna psilus Calvert and Telebasis sanguinalis Calvert are recorded from the Lesser Antilles for the first time.


Myodocopid Ostracoda (Cypridinacea) from the Philippine Islands
Louis S. Kornicker
32 pages, 18 figures, 5 tables
1970 (Date of Issue: 11 February 1970)
Number 39, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.39
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Seven species (6 new) of myodocopid Ostracoda are described. These were collected in 1967 during an ecological survey jointly sponsored by the University of Hawaii and the Smithsonian Oceanographic Sorting Center.


Ostracoda (Myodocopina) from the Peru-Chile Trench and the Antarctic Ocean
Louis S. Kornicker
42 pages, 25 figures
1970 (Date of Issue: 11 February 1970)
Number 32, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.32
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Abstract

Myodocopid ostracods collected on cruise 11 of the RV Anton Bruun to the Peru-Chile Trench in 1965 are described, including four new species. Also described are two new species of the genus Spinacopia from Antarctica collected in 1964 on cruises 11 and 12 of the RV Eltanin. A supplementary description is given of the holotype of Azygocypridina imperator (Brady, 1880), the type-species of the genus.


The Nearctic Species of Orgilus Haliday (Hymenoptera: Braconidae)
Carl F. W. Muesebeck
104 pages, 57 figures
1970 (Date of Issue: 20 February 1970)
Number 30, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.30
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

The species of the braconid genus Orgilus are all internal parasites of lepidopterous larvae, principally of the larvae of Microlepidoptera; some have been employed in the biological control of troublesome pest species. The number of different kinds seems to be very great. In the present paper 107 Nearctic species are treated, all except 16 of these previously undescribed. Keys to the genera considered as comprising the subfamily Orgilinae and to the species of Orgilus recognized in the paper are followed by detailed descriptions of the species.


The Tenrecs: A Study in Mammalian Behavior and Evolution
J. F. Eisenberg and Edwin Gould
137 pages, 77 figures, 13 tables
1970 (Date of Issue: 9 March 1970)
Number 27, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.27
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Tenrecs are found only on the island of Madagascar. The biology of the Tenrecidae is described by field and laboratory studies that focused on comparisons of social behavior and communication in several species. Detailed observations on the behavior of Echinops, Setifer, Tenrec, Hemicentetes, and Microgale are related to ecological adaptations of each genus.

Experimental manipulations of Hemicentetes revealed that a sound-producing organ composed of dorsal quills functions to coordinate the movements of mother and infants. Evolutionary trends in structure and behavior of the tenrecs are discussed. The mammalian feeding niches of Panama and Madagascar are compared.


A Field Guide to the Cidaroid Echinoids of the Northwestern Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea
Thomas Phelan
67 pages, 7 figures, 22 plates
1970 (Date of Issue: 10 March 1970)
Number 40, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.40
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Full Description (from SIRIS)

Abstract

Twelve species of cidaroid echinoids from the northwestern Atlantic Ocean, Gulf of Mexico, and the Caribbean Sea are described, compared, illustrated, and keyed for identification. The first description of the denuded test of Histocidaris nuttingi Mortensen is presented. A lectotype and paralectotype are selected for Histocidaris sharreri (A. Agassiz). Poriocidaris purpurata (Wyville Thompson), previously known from the eastern Atlantic, is reported for the first time from the Caribbean Sea.


Benthic Ecology of Bahia de San Quintin, Baja California
J. Laurens Barnard
60 pages, 18 figures, 12 tables
1970 (Date of Issue: 10 March 1970)
Number 44, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.44
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Abstract

Three important biotic assemblages and several minor associations occur on the soft bottoms of San Quintin Bay. The most obvious assemblage is characterized by the eelgrass, Zostera marina, that covers approximately 20 percent of the study area. A second densely populated assemblage occurs in tidal channels and on their margins and is dominated by a globular ascidian, Eugyra glutinans, and a tube-forming amphipod, Ampelisca compressa. That community merges with a poorly populated Prionospio (polychaete) community occupying sand flats in shallow, quiet water; the two are asymmetrically connected by a facies (or ecotone) characterized especially by two genera of amphipods, Acuminodeutopus and Rudilemboides. A less widespread fourth assemblage, dominated by a polychaete genus Fabricia, occurs primarily adjacent to marshes, especially in the inner reaches of the lagoon. Three phases of the Prionospio community occur, the typical phase and phases dominated by the polychaetes Scoloplos acmeceps and Cossura candida. The Ampelisca-Eugyra community also exists in extreme phases dominated by either of the principal members.

The Prionospio community is interpreted as a base community representing a penetration from the open sea of an analogous community in shallow waters on which is imposed the Zostera community where suitable banks are elevated above the surrounding flats. The Zostera community has few elements in common with the Phyllospadix (surfgrass) community of the open sea. The Eugyra-Ampelisca community occurs mainly in channels and at the feet of banks where water motion is highest in the bay. The Eugyra-Ampelisca community is unique to the literature but has affinities with open-sea Tellina communities.

San Quintin has few of the cosmopolitan taxa usually introduced into bays by humans. The warm-temperate lagoons of California and Baja California have few common denominators probably because of changes imposed by man. Very few species in San Quintin are obligatory inhabitants of lagoons.

San Quintin is unusual in being controlled physiographically by cinder cones; the west arm is a typical lagoon, whereas the east arm has characteristics of a drowned river valley.

A hypothetical system of lagoonal maturation and senescence is proposed in which the depositional influences are accelerated by soft-bodied benthic biota.


Ostracoda in Texas Bays and Lagoons: An Ecologic Study
Charles E. King and Louis S. Kornicker
92 pages, 15 figures, 21 plates, 19 tables
1970 (Date of Issue: 25 March 1970)
Number 24, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.24
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Abstract

Ostracods were collected monthly for about one year in Copano Bay, Redfish Bay, and the Laguna Madre, Texas, along a salinity gradient that ranged from 9.7 to 50.0 parts per thousand. This study describes the ostracods encountered and analyzes the environmental factors influencing their distribution.


The Avifauna of Northern Latin America: A Symposium Held at the Smithsonian Institution 13-15 April 1966
Helmut K. Buechner and Jimmie H. Buechner, editors
119 pages, 4 figures
1970 (Date of Issue: 3 April 1970)
Number 26, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.26
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Abstract

This conference was conceived by William Vogt, who is well known for his early concern with the ecological consequences of the human population explosion, as expressed in his book Road to Survival (New York: William Sloane Associates, 1948). Over three decades of field observation in Latin America have provided him with a view of environmental changes, particularly the destruction of forest vegetation, that few other scholars have experienced. The conference was convened to determine, through an exchange of information, whether the drastic modification and elimination of the wintering habitat of many breeding birds of North America may be responsible for depressed levels of populations.

The assemblage of most of the outstanding scholars of bird life in Central America, Colombia, and Venezuela at the Smithsonian Institution resulted in a remarkable accumulation of information and exchange of ideas. Fourteen individual papers were presented, each of which was followed by discussion. Further discussion took place in a plenary session after the papers on the individual countries. In lieu of resolutions the conferees agreed on a series of suggestions which are presented in these proceedings.

The conference was organized by the Smithsonian Office of Ecology, and made possible by a generous grant from the Conservation Foundation.

We would like to express our gratitude to Paul Slud, Associate Curator, Division of Birds, National Museum of Natural History, for verifying the spelling of scientific names and for his considerable assistance with the final editing.

The Editors


Displaying 31 - 40 from the 644 total records