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Smithsonian Institution Scholarly Press Smithsonian Institution Libraries
Displaying 31 - 40 from the 644 total records
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Behavioral and Life-History Notes on Three Floridian Solitary Wasps (Hymenoptera: Sphecidae)
Karl V. Krombein
26 pages, 78 figures, 3 tables
1970 (Date of Issue: 25 May 1970)
Number 46, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.46
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Abstract

A new trap to attract solitary twig-nesting wasps and bees was developed and tested in Florida. It permits observation and photography of the nesting behavior during nest construction and, subsequently, of the development of the progeny. Observations and photographs were made of the nesting behavior and subsequent development of three sphecid wasps, Isodontia (Murrayella) auripes (Fernald), Podium rufipes (Fabricius), and Trypargilum collinum collinum (Smith).


Benthic Ecology of Bahia de San Quintin, Baja California
J. Laurens Barnard
60 pages, 18 figures, 12 tables
1970 (Date of Issue: 10 March 1970)
Number 44, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.44
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Abstract

Three important biotic assemblages and several minor associations occur on the soft bottoms of San Quintin Bay. The most obvious assemblage is characterized by the eelgrass, Zostera marina, that covers approximately 20 percent of the study area. A second densely populated assemblage occurs in tidal channels and on their margins and is dominated by a globular ascidian, Eugyra glutinans, and a tube-forming amphipod, Ampelisca compressa. That community merges with a poorly populated Prionospio (polychaete) community occupying sand flats in shallow, quiet water; the two are asymmetrically connected by a facies (or ecotone) characterized especially by two genera of amphipods, Acuminodeutopus and Rudilemboides. A less widespread fourth assemblage, dominated by a polychaete genus Fabricia, occurs primarily adjacent to marshes, especially in the inner reaches of the lagoon. Three phases of the Prionospio community occur, the typical phase and phases dominated by the polychaetes Scoloplos acmeceps and Cossura candida. The Ampelisca-Eugyra community also exists in extreme phases dominated by either of the principal members.

The Prionospio community is interpreted as a base community representing a penetration from the open sea of an analogous community in shallow waters on which is imposed the Zostera community where suitable banks are elevated above the surrounding flats. The Zostera community has few elements in common with the Phyllospadix (surfgrass) community of the open sea. The Eugyra-Ampelisca community occurs mainly in channels and at the feet of banks where water motion is highest in the bay. The Eugyra-Ampelisca community is unique to the literature but has affinities with open-sea Tellina communities.

San Quintin has few of the cosmopolitan taxa usually introduced into bays by humans. The warm-temperate lagoons of California and Baja California have few common denominators probably because of changes imposed by man. Very few species in San Quintin are obligatory inhabitants of lagoons.

San Quintin is unusual in being controlled physiographically by cinder cones; the west arm is a typical lagoon, whereas the east arm has characteristics of a drowned river valley.

A hypothetical system of lagoonal maturation and senescence is proposed in which the depositional influences are accelerated by soft-bodied benthic biota.


Benthic Marine Cypridinacea from Hawaii (Ostracoda)
Louis S. Kornicker
24 pages, 19 figures, 1 table
1976 (Date of Issue: 1 September 1976)
Number 231, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.231
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Abstract

A new genus and two new species in the family Sarsiellidae, and one new species in the family Cylindroleberididae, from a shallow lagoon between Paiko Peninsula and a fringing coral reef in Maunalua Bay on the southern coast of Oahu, Hawaii, are described and illustrated. Benthic Cypridinacea have not previously been recorded from Hawaii.


Benthic Marine Cypridinoidea from Bermuda (Ostracoda)
Louis S. Kornicker
15 pages, 10 figures
1981 (Date of Issue: 13 July 1981)
Number 331, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.331
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Abstract

Four species in four genera of benthic Cypridinoidea are reported from Bermuda. Two new species are described and illustrated, and a supplementary description is given of a previously described species. One of the species is described but left in open nomenclature. Benthic marine Cypridinoidea have not previously been reported from Bermuda.


Bibliography and Zoological Taxa of Paul Bartsch
Florence A. Ruhoff
166 pages
1973 (Date of Issue: 20 July 1973)
Number 143, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.143
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Abstract

A compilation, alphabetically arranged, of all zoological taxa proposed by Dr. Paul Bartsch from 1901 to 1955, most of them in the phylum Mollusca, but also including one subspecies of bird and two genera in the Tunicata. The catalog number of the holotype of each species is given. The catalog of taxa is preceded by a biographical sketch of Dr. Bartsch and a complete list of his publications. The last section is a list of species and subspecies described by Bartsch arranged alphabetically by genera and subgenera. [Includes biographical sketch by Harald A. Rehder.]


A Bibliography of the Catalogs, Lists, Faunal and Other Papers on the Butterflies of North America North of Mexico Arranged by State and Province (Lepidoptera: Rhopalocera)
William D. Field, Cyril F. dos Passos and John H. Masters
104 pages
1974 (Date of Issue: 20 February 1974)
Number 157, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.157
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Abstract

This bibliography is designed to provide a guide to what has already been published upon the fauna of North America north of Mexico in the form of manuals, guides, catalogs, lists of species, additions to lists of species, and the like.


Biodiversity of the Domatia Occupants (Ants, Wasps, Bees, and Others) of the Sri Lankan Myrmecophyte Humboldtia laurifolia Vahl (Fabaceae)
Karl V. Krombein, Beth B. Norden, Melinda M. Rickson and Fred R. Rickson
34 pages, 70 figures
1999 (Date of Issue: 29 July 1999)
Number 603, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.603
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Abstract

The myrmecophyte Humboldtia laurifolia is endemic to Sri Lanka, where it is a common understory tree in lowland rainforests. It attracts a diversity of invertebrate associates and possesses morphology and phenology, including expanded, hollow, self-opening internodes and a variety of extrafloral nectaries that facilitate a relationship with ants.

Fourteen ant taxa were collected on H. laurifolia. Technomyrmex albipes (F. Smith) was dominant at many sites. Other ant taxa included Tetraponera sp., Cataulacus taprobanae F. Smith, three species of Crematogaster, Pheidole sp., Tetramorium pacificum Mayr, Dolichoderus sp., Tapinoma sp., Anoplolepis gracilipes (F. Smith), Camponotus sp., Oecophylla smaragdina (Fabricius), and Polyrhachis bugnioni Forel.

Among other invertebrates found on H. laurifolia was the internode-nesting crabronine wasp Krombeinictus nordenae Leclercq. It is unique among Sphecidae in its attentive maternal care, progressive feeding of pollen to a single larva at a time, and cocoon placement and structure.

Also commonly found nesting in Humboldtia was the crabronine Crossocerus mukalanae Leclercq. It makes a typical crabronine nest, constructing a linear series of cells from fragments of the dried, collapsed plant pith within the internode. The paralyzed prey provided for the larvae were predominantly Diptera, the majority of them nematocerous species; other less common prey included chalcidoid wasps and Ephemeroptera. Several species of Perilampus (Chalcidoidea) are pupal parasites of C. mukalanae, and larvae and adults of species of Staphylinidae found in wasp nests are presumed to be brood predators.

A much less common hymenopteran nesting in internodes was an undescribed species of the social xylocopine bee Braunsapis. Four nests contained one or two females, an occasional male, and immature brood. A larva of a species of Cleridae, presumably a brood predator, was found in two of the nests.

Several invertebrate associates of Humboldtia are clearly ant predators. The fly larva of Platyceridion edax Chandler and Matile (Keroplatidae) is primarily predaceous on worker ants. Also recorded were the larvae of Microdon sp. (Syrphidae), which feed on ant brood, and the pseudoscorpion Haplochernes warburgi (Tullgren), which is predatory on worker ants. The relationship of other associates was less clear. These included spiders (Theridiidae, Hadrotarsinae), the bee Nomada wickwari Meade-waldo (Anthophoridae), the wasps Carinostigmus costatus Krombein (Sphecidae) and Physetopoda fumigata (Turner) (Mutillidae), and numerous specimens of Pscoptera and Collembola.

Also, clusters of an arboreal annelid, Perionyx sp. (Megascolecidae), were found in some internodes, and individuals were noted crawling on stems or leaves during light rains. Adults were observed mating on foliage and were never found on the ground.

The diapausing larva of Krombeinictus nordenae is described in an appendix by Howard E. Evans. It is not significantly different from other crabronine larvae of the genera Crossocerus, Crabro, and Rhopalum, even though the larvae were fed pollen rather than paralyzed arthropods.


The Biological Investigation of Malpelo Island, Colombia
Jeffrey B. Graham, editor
98 pages, 35 figures, 9 tables
1975 (Date of Issue: 18 July 1975)
Number 176, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.176
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Abstract

The results of joint Smithsonian Institution and U. S. Navy terrestrial and marine investigations of Malpelo Island, Republic of Colombia are reported in 15 papers in this volume. A new species of lizard (Phyllodactylus), a new starfish (Tamaria), two new species of shrimp (Alpheus and Synalpheus), and a new species of fish (Chriolepis) are described. The terrestrial ecology of Malpelo and the behavior and natural history of the lizards Anolis agassizi and Diploglossus millepunctatus are described and discussed. Genic variability in A. agassizi has been investigated and karyotypes of A. agassizi and D. millepunctatus are reported. The ecology of the island's benthic marine communities is detailed and papers listing and discussing zoogeographically interesting features of the island's crustacean, starfish, and fish species are included. The geology of Malpelo is briefly described and an improved map of the island is presented. The importance of Malpelo Island in the understanding of biogeographic problems in the eastern tropical Pacific Ocean is reviewed.


Biological Observations on Mesoplodon carlhubbsi (Cetacea: Ziphiidae)
James G. Mead, William A. Walker and Warren J. Houck
25 pages, 11 figures, 4 tables
1982 (Date of Issue: 3 February 1982)
Number 344, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.344
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Abstract

The literature reports of Mesoplodon carlhubbsi strandings are confusing, owing to the erroneous identification of Mesoplodon species. Mesoplodon carlhubbsi is distinct from M. stejnegeri and closely related to M. bowdoini. Adult M. carlhubbsi are recognized by white (males) or light-colored (females) beaks. We report 31 strandings of this species from both the east and west coasts of the North Pacific. Scarring is very marked in older males and probably results from intraspecific aggression. Calving season is in the summer. Length at birth is about 250 cm. Both females and males reach 488-532 cm at physical maturity. Food items are fish and squid. Distribution extends from the confluence of the Kuroshio and Oyashio currents in the west to the mixed region of the California current in the east.


Biological Studies of the Bermuda Ocean Acre: Planktonic Ostracoda
Louis S. Kornicker, Sheldon Wirsing and Maura McManus
34 pages, 20 figures, 9 tables
1976 (Date of Issue: 21 June 1976)
Number 223, Smithsonian Contributions to Zoology
DOI: 10.5479/si.00810282.223
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Abstract

Planktonic Ostracoda from depths of surface to 1170 m collected aboard the Research Vessels Trident, Albatross IV, and USNS Sands during 1967 to 1970 on Ocean Acre Cruises 1, 7, 9, and 10 are studied with main emphasis on Cypridinacea and on Cruise 10. The data suggest that the cypridinid species Macrocypridina castanea and the Halocyprididae migrate upward nightly. The collections indicate that M. castanea is primarily an inhabitant of the bathypelagic zone, and that G. muelleri is primarily an inhabitant of the bathypelagic and upper abyssalpelagic zones. Halocyprids were collected at all depths but occurred in the greatest frequency in the epipelagic zone. The reported upper temperatures range of G. muelleri is increased by 10°, to 14.9°C by the distribution of the species in samples from Cruise 10. The stomach contents of M. castanea indicate that the species is a predator. Ovigerous females of M. castanea have previously been reported from collections made during May and July; the present cruises show that ovigerous females also are present during June, early September, late October, and early November. Reproduction may be less during winter months.

The phenomenon of the swallowing of the bristles of the Ist antenna by specimens of M. castanea is studied, and it is suggested that this may take place during the throes of being captured or killed. Swallowing of bristles of the 2nd antenna by this species is reported for the first time. SEM studies of M. castanea and G. muelleri reveal that both species bear lateral glandular fields on the upper lips in addition to previously reported anteroventral fields, and that the comb teeth of the 7th limbs bear terminal pores. The shells of both species have pores and are laminated. The copulatory organ of the adult male M. castanea has pores in the clawlike spine of the anterior proximal lobe and at the tip of the 2nd joint of the posterior, distal lobe.


Displaying 31 - 40 from the 644 total records